All Blog Posts Tagged 'international' (11)

Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Winter 2017 Issue

We are pleased to present the Winter 2017 issue of Ethics & International Affairs!

This issue contains essays by Jonathan D. Caverley on how to slow the proliferation of major conventional weapons and Janos Pasztor on why…

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Added by Carnegie Council on December 11, 2017 at 11:53am — No Comments

Call for Papers!

Ethics & International Affairs, the quarterly peer-reviewed publication of the Carnegie Council, is pleased to invite submissions for upcoming issues.



The journal bridges the gap between theory and practice by featuring articles, essays, and reviews that integrate rigorous thinking about principles of ethics and justice into discussions of practical…

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Added by Carnegie Council on October 27, 2017 at 3:00pm — No Comments

International relations and their relation to other concepts

is the concept of international relations of the concepts that aroused considerable controversy, and many of the problems, both theoretical and applied research, analytical, and refer to the overlapping of the complexity of the many terms and concepts of international relations, where we find that there is no agreed definition by western scientists and researchers.

 Unesco has decided in 1948 several topics of international relations has emerged many terms near term international…

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Added by Hanane Saouli on August 19, 2017 at 6:00pm — 2 Comments

The dialectic of the relationship between international humanitarian law and human rights law

    International humanitarian law in times of war and conflict, if in turn to a set of international rules from the settlement of humanitarian problems arising from armed conflicts, on the one hand, it aims to achieve the pain of war, by organizing intellectual operations or means of war. It is this post's comments, aimed at the protection of persons injured, prisoners, and civilians, as well as the properties that are affected by the armed conflict, either…

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Added by Hanane Saouli on August 5, 2017 at 2:30pm — 2 Comments

Hacksaw Ridge and International Relations

United States was in a full-fledged war with Japan during the World War II, and every able-bodied American men were signing up for the army. Seeing his brother enlisting, and seeing more and more people around him wearing military uniforms, Desmond decides to join the army. However, Desmond is soon faced with a big trouble; he resists bearing arms as a conscientious objector, and even refuses to train on Saturdays, as he is a Seventh-day Adventist. Desmond’s refusals outrage the sergeant and…

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Added by Minkwan Seo on November 19, 2016 at 12:00pm — No Comments

Ethics Matter: Zainab Salbi on Women, War, and Self-Empowerment

Introduction

MARLENE SPOERRI: Welcome to Ethics Matter. I'm Marlene Spoerri, program officer for Ethics Matter here at Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs.…

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Added by Carnegie Council on March 8, 2016 at 12:41pm — No Comments

A Step Back for South Africa on the Rule of Law, Courtesy of Al-Bashir

Published originally in the World Post Section of the Huffington Post on 19 June 2015:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jesica-l-santos/a-step-back-for-south-afr_b_7614908.html

This past week the South African government showed utter disregard for its international legal obligations and rule of law when it reportedly assisted the escape from its territory of Sudanese President Omar…

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Added by Jesica L Santos on June 25, 2015 at 2:04pm — 1 Comment

Non-use of nuclear weapons: Why nuclear weapons are outlawed, and why the window left open in 1996 was a failure

In recent years the debate on outlawing nuclear weapons has (re)emerged. By naming personal experienced events, I have tried to summarize this issue - which, in my point of view, has a strong normative ethical componant. 

Background

In the bold discussions on the NPT and its review process, some states argue with legal and normative obligations not to use nuclear weapons. The non-Alignement Movement (NAM) and the New Agenda Coalition (NAC) stated that the use of nuclear weapons…

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Added by Armin Hübner on August 22, 2013 at 8:09am — 1 Comment

Bhatai build world! Moral leadership from Bhit Shah

Bhatai build world!

Moral leadership from Bhit Shah.

Bhit-sand and shah-person. Handerads years ago a greatest poet of world lived inside the sandy place, named Hala city, province Sindh land (a mother land of Pakistan and India, The land of Moen-jo-Daro, oldest civilization of world)where he entire life spent to educate to teach world and gives happiness and sustainable development’’. This is meaning of moral and great leadership who live inside…

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Added by ShahJahan leghari on August 12, 2013 at 11:30am — No Comments

To what extent?

The reason that most scholars attribute to the “failure” of International Law, is that it is purely consent based. Treaties that bind a state through its consent, ratification and accession alone can be invoked against it. Customary norms that a state does not persistently or subsequently object to are the only things that bind it. Judicial decisions do not hold sway with the principle of stare decisis, as they bind only those states that are party to it. Any source of law, therefore, is…

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Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on March 24, 2013 at 2:10am — No Comments

The Global Peace Index: Can data tell us if the world is becoming more peaceful?

A few days ago, Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker tweeted a link to the 2012 Global Peace Index (GPI), a metric published by the Institute for Economics and Peace, saying "the world is more peaceful in 2012." The GPI calculates peace using 23 indicators, including political terror, internal conflicts,…

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Added by Alexa van Sickle on June 18, 2012 at 3:30pm — No Comments

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Carnegie Council

A Russian Take on the Kurds and U.S. Foreign Policy

A Russian defense news site declared the United States an "unreliable ally" after the the withdrawal of American troops from Northern Syria. Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev connects this characterization to the need for leaders to connect a specific policy action to a larger, understandable narrative for the American public.

The Struggle for Recognition in International Relations, with Michelle Murray

How can established powers manage the peaceful rise of new great powers? Bard's Michelle Murray offers a new answer to this perennial question, arguing that power transitions are principally social phenomena whereby rising powers struggle to obtain recognition as world powers. How can this framework help us to understand the economic and military rivalry between United States and China?

Gen Z, Climate Change Activism, & Foreign Policy, with Tatiana Serafin

Generation Z makes up over 30 percent of the world's population and this group of people, most under the age of 20, are already having an extraordinary effect on society, culture, and politics. Tatiana Serafin, journalism professor at Marymount Manhattan College, breaks down the power of this generation, focusing on climate change activism. How can they turn their energy into concrete action?

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