All Blog Posts Tagged 'human' (24)

Migration and Xenophobia in South America. Why the Venezuelan Crisis Matters?

Last week, increasing events have again put Venezuela in the international spotlight. A crosscutting thematic on democracy, human rights, and sovereignty are part of this complex scenario. A challenging puzzle that includes diverse key actors in the region, economic sanctions, and a growing social stigma towards the Venezuelan migrants. 

The turbulence and uncertainty in Venezuelan politics and, an historical economic crisis represented by an unprecedented hyperinflation in 2018, have…

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Added by Daniela Segovia Hernández on January 28, 2019 at 8:30pm — No Comments

Scientific Press: Between Theory and Practice

    Now witnessing the scientific press specialized in the field of science and technology and the new shift in terms of quantity and type; in view of the appearance of several new scientific and research projects and plans, and the holding of international scientific conferences in the fields of modern constantly.

What is meant Scientific Press?

   …

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Added by Hanane Saouli on February 25, 2018 at 1:12pm — No Comments

Terrorism and the Arab Waves : the focusof the global challenge

       The humanitarian community as a whole suffers many risks that undermined the stability and security such as wars and colonialism, racial discrimination, and terrorism, the latter, who form a strong storm large wave hit the world polluted the subtropical climate, which in itself is the biggest challenge to the global threat to the economy of the State, which depend on it.

And terrorism, which has become an…

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Added by Hanane Saouli on December 20, 2017 at 1:30pm — 2 Comments

Global Ethics Day 2017 - Combatting Human Trafficking

According to the United Nations' Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, human trafficking is:

 “...the recruitment, transportation, transfer,

harbouring

or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, or fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the…
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Added by Billy Pickett on October 12, 2017 at 3:00pm — No Comments

New Book, "The Ordinary Virtues: Moral Order in a Divided World" by Carnegie Council Centennial Chair Michael Ignatieff

What moral values do human beings hold in common? As globalization draws us together economically, are our values converging or diverging? In particular, are human rights becoming a global ethic? These were the questions that led Michael Ignatieff to embark on a three-year, eight-nation journey in search of answers. …

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Added by Carnegie Council on September 20, 2017 at 1:56pm — No Comments

The dialectic of the relationship between international humanitarian law and human rights law

    International humanitarian law in times of war and conflict, if in turn to a set of international rules from the settlement of humanitarian problems arising from armed conflicts, on the one hand, it aims to achieve the pain of war, by organizing intellectual operations or means of war. It is this post's comments, aimed at the protection of persons injured, prisoners, and civilians, as well as the properties that are affected by the armed conflict, either…

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Added by Hanane Saouli on August 5, 2017 at 2:30pm — 2 Comments

The Problems with Burma's Upcoming "Landmark" Elections

 

As November 8th approaches, news and commentary about the “landmark” Burmese general elections are picking up. As usual, I have my own thoughts about the growing buzz surrounding Election Day.

Let's start off with some quick background information. The upcoming November 8th election in Burma is widely considered to be one of the most important political events in the nation’s history. The authoritarian regime, still warring with several ethnic rebel…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on September 9, 2015 at 4:00pm — 2 Comments

A Step Back for South Africa on the Rule of Law, Courtesy of Al-Bashir

Published originally in the World Post Section of the Huffington Post on 19 June 2015:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jesica-l-santos/a-step-back-for-south-afr_b_7614908.html

This past week the South African government showed utter disregard for its international legal obligations and rule of law when it reportedly assisted the escape from its territory of Sudanese President Omar…

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Added by Jesica L Santos on June 25, 2015 at 2:04pm — 1 Comment

Political Prisoner for a Day: Why Small-Scale Crackdowns Still Work

The past week has confirmed that despite the Burmese government's made-for-export show of reforms, there is still no such thing as political freedom in Burma. Yet, you probably haven't read anything about the nation's ongoing (but increasingly repressed) student protests in this week's headlines. That's largely because the regime has responded in such a way that is threatening enough to stifle dissent at home, but not violent enough to invoke international outrage. This is the "sweet spot"…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on March 15, 2015 at 1:12am — No Comments

Roland Hughes’s ‘John Smith-last known survivor of the Microsoft wars’ - a review

And the world is shaping us again!

The days of apocalypse are over-indomitable life force has defeated the power of destruction again-it is a new dawn of human civilization.

And no-this time the power of destruction is not from any external force-no alien power has invaded the earth, no comet has shattered the terrestrial life, no ice age has destroyed the rhythm of life.

The destruction has come within-the suspicion, greed, lust of a species called mankind had triggered the…

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Added by JAYASREE ROY on March 6, 2015 at 2:37am — No Comments

HUMAN AND NONHUMAN- ONE AMAZING SAGA……….

Life on earth can be traced back to a history of interaction between living beings and the environment. It is only in the last five hundred years or so a species named Homo sapiens has made a lasting and sever change to the way mother earth interacts with her offspring. The industrial revolution and the last two world wars have made a fast changing in the environment pattern of the world. The unexpected surge of technical and scientific thoughts and products has not only made a lasting…

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Added by JAYASREE ROY on February 25, 2015 at 11:44am — No Comments

Why I’m Following the Burmese Student Protests, and the US Government Should Be Too

Over the past few months, the world has largely overlooked a series of peaceful protests by Burmese students that began in November, coinciding with President Obama’s visit to the Southeast Asian nation. The students are protesting the country’s new National Education Law, which maintains close, centralized government control of the nation’s educational institutions and limit students’ freedom of association (read more…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on February 13, 2015 at 12:30am — 1 Comment

A better future for humanity (for decades to come)

Our imagination can be our source of inspiration, but it also can be our downfall. So, the task of imagining a better future will be a no easy task, since we are susceptible to our sometimes selfish, melancholic, or even altruistic reasoning without thinking the realistic capabilities of our imagination. Therefore, when I was imagining my perspective of better future, I would like to imagine without restriction, in terms of feasibility or even our present capabilities.   

The first…

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Added by Hadi Akbar on January 4, 2015 at 10:30am — 2 Comments

Burma and the Ethics of Engagement

A question I've been grappling with lately concerns engagement with foreign governments that systematically violate human rights. When foreign governments are behaving badly, should we engage with them and try to encourage reform, or sanction them and cut off ties? Is engagement the path to reform, or does it merely reward bad behavior? While this dilemma is central to many foreign affairs situations, this post will focus on…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on December 19, 2014 at 12:30am — 6 Comments

An Agreement That Never Should Have Happened Is Declared Unconstitutional

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jesica-l-santos/

This past week, an Argentinian Federal Court declared null the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) that …

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Added by Jesica L Santos on May 21, 2014 at 7:14pm — No Comments

Memory and Justice: Confronting Past Atrocity and Human Rights Abuse

http://www.issuelab.org/click/download1/memory_and_justice_confronting_past_atrocity_and_human_rights_abuse

of the International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) as a consultancy report for the Ford Foundation’s Andean Region and
The authors acknowledge the indispensable editorial contributions,research assistance, and logistical support of…
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Added by Jesica L Santos on May 7, 2014 at 10:26pm — No Comments

From Amnesties Toward Peace and Reconciliation: Cambodia, Chile, and Mozambique

The goal of this inquiry is to analyze whether or not there can be peace and reconciliation in cases where conflict and massive civil strife were followed by blanket amnesties which included crimes against humanity and gross violations of human rights.

The following case studies examine what took place in three different countries – Cambodia, Chile, and Mozambique – each of which experienced violent domestic conflict and massive human rights violations. The…

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Added by Jesica L Santos on May 7, 2014 at 10:09pm — No Comments

Cosmopolitanism: Pluralism, Dialogue, and Global Citizenry for a New Era

Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers 

Kwame Anthony Appiah

New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2007.

196 pages



Kwame Anthony Appiah challenges us to adopt the moral manifesto of “cosmopolitanism,” a loyalty to all of humanity, and begs the question of what we owe to strangers simply by virtue of our shared humanity. He joins an important conversation in global ethics on…

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Added by Caitlin Duffy on November 26, 2013 at 10:30am — 1 Comment

Syria’s most dreadful scenario

At the center of Za’atri, in northern Jordan, there’s a bustle of commercial activity. The “Champs-Elysees”, as the main street is known, hosts more than one hundred small street businesses, including rudimentary food shops, barber shops, clothes shops and even a tiny library. Coffee shops are on the rise, and surrounding the “downtown”, as it is called, there are already 12 neighborhoods, and even some soccer fields.

This description could seem certainly alluring if you don’t have in…

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Added by Ana Polo Alonso on October 23, 2013 at 5:37pm — 3 Comments

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Carnegie Council

The Crack-Up: The 1919 Elaine Massacre & the Struggle to Remember, with Nan Woodruff

The massacre in rural Elaine, Arkansas was one of the most violent episodes of 1919's Red Summer of racist confrontations, but it also remains one of the least-known. In this talk with historian Ted Widmer, Penn State's Professor Nan Woodruff explains the causes and how it fits in to the post-World War I context. Why are people still reluctant to speak about this massacre? How should we remember this dark chapter in American history?

The Individual & the Collective, Politics, & the UN, with Jean-Marie Guéhenno

Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Jean-Marie Guéhenno, former head of United Nations peacekeeping operations, discusses the tensions between the individual and the collective in a world filled with political tension, pervasive surveillance, and fear of risk. What is the role of the UN in this environment? How can we avoid the violent upheavals that marked other transitional phases in humanity?

A Russian Take on the Kurds and U.S. Foreign Policy

A Russian defense news site declared the United States an "unreliable ally" after the the withdrawal of American troops from Northern Syria. Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev connects this characterization to the need for leaders to connect a specific policy action to a larger, understandable narrative for the American public.

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