All Blog Posts Tagged 'economics' (6)

Thought Leader: Dan Ariely

DEVIN STEWART: Dr. Ariely, it's so good to have you here today.

When you look at the world today, how do you see the world? How would you describe it, particularly from a moral perspective?

DAN ARIELY: I think morality has a few elements to it. It's a real struggle between what's good for me and…

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Added by Carnegie Council on March 4, 2013 at 5:30pm — 2 Comments

The Value of Money For Nothing

Blog post written by Donnie Maclurcan, co-founder of the Post Growth Institute

Giving things away freely – time, knowledge, possessions and money - has been and continues to be a truly valuable aspect of my freedom. My grandmother was a big inspiration. She lived simply yet, in the last years of her life, if you commented appreciatively about any item in her house she would suggest you take it. In part, her…

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Added by Jen Hinton on October 31, 2012 at 5:13pm — No Comments

Time for a New Macroeconomics Realization

Unfortunately for the progress of the human race we seem to know very little about how to govern ourselves and the result is a lot of guesswork without apply much science or logic. But there is a means for better understanding of how our system of society or macroeconomics actually functions, which I have developed and which I can supply.

The past history of macroeconomic thought contained several impotant steps toward this development of this science, but it fell short in recent…

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Added by David Harold Chester on June 29, 2012 at 10:00am — 1 Comment

A Peaceful Planet, but Not a Happy One?

Last week, the Global Peace Index 2012 (GPI) indicated that the world is more peaceful this year than in 2011. But how should we interpret this in light of the more sober conclusions of the latest Happy Planet Index (HPI)?

The Global Peace Index…

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Added by Alexa van Sickle on June 25, 2012 at 1:00pm — No Comments

Carnegie Council LIVE: Money and the Good Life: How Much is Enough?

LIVE WEBCAST June 12, approx 1:15 PM ET (UTC/GMT -4 hours)

If you are having difficulties viewing the webcast, please click here.

In 1930, Keynes predicted that by 2030, we'd be working a 15-hour week; but he underestimated our appetite for wealth. Robert and Edward Skidelsky explain why Keynes was mistaken, and…

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Added by Carnegie Council on June 12, 2012 at 11:54am — No Comments

The Predicament of Poverty

We called him 'Bapu' and he called us 'Bapu' too! Every time we visited Hanuman Sarange's farm, Bapu would greet us "Ram Ram Bapuuu" with a faint smile on his wrinkled face. A few months passed like this and when we got some time alone, I asked bapu about his life and how he ended up with his brother. He started talking, looking away in void, as if his life story was…

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Added by Anukool Chavhan on June 3, 2012 at 12:00am — 1 Comment

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The Crack-Up: Dwight Eisenhower & the Road Trip that Changed America, with Brian C. Black

In 1919, a young Army officer named Dwight Eisenhower, along with a "Mad Max"-style military convoy, set out on a cross-country road trip to examine the nascent state of America's roads. Penn State Altoona's Professor Brian C. Black explains how this trip influenced Eisenhower's decisions decades later, both as general and president, and laid the groundwork for the rise of petroleum-based engines and the interstate highway system.

AI in the Arctic: Future Opportunities & Ethical Concerns, with Fritz Allhoff

How can artificial intelligence improve food security, medicine, and infrastructure in Arctic communities? What are some logistical, ethical, and governance challenges? Western Michigan's Professor Fritz Allhoff details the future of technology in this extreme environment, which is being made more accessible because of climate change. Plus he shares his thoughts on some open philosophical questions surrounding AI.

The Ethical Algorithm, with Michael Kearns

Over the course of a generation, algorithms have gone from mathematical abstractions to powerful mediators of daily life. They have made our lives more efficient, yet are increasingly encroaching on our basic rights. UPenn's Professor Michael Kearns shares some ideas on how to better embed human principles into machine code without halting the advance of data-driven scientific exploration.

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