All Blog Posts Tagged 'Asia' (16)

ASEAN as a Multi-Religious Organization: Where to go?

JOSEPH CORDEVILLA NEGRILLO

Master of ASEAN Studies

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Southeast Asia (SEA) is a community of divergent identities composed of five major religions (Islam, Buddhism, Confucianism, Christianity, and Hinduism).  The socio-religious diversity is a potential challenge to ASEAN integration given that the member states’ domestic laws, most especially the Islamic countries which are primarily adherent to their customary laws reflected in Qur’an, should be…

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Added by Joseph Cordevilla Negrillo on December 25, 2016 at 1:45am — No Comments

Nationalism and Nation-Building in Southeast Asia: A Comparative Discussion

Joseph C. Negrillo

Master of ASEAN Studies

 

                      “Nationalism – idea not ideology, taking many forms – has not only been a means to create a state: it has also been a means to sustain one, evoked in a struggle with other states or as a means to consolidate a regime or both.”

- Nicholas Tarling, 2004

NATIONALISM & NATION-BUILDING IN SOUTHEAST ASIA

It…

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Added by Joseph Cordevilla Negrillo on December 22, 2016 at 8:00am — No Comments

The Problems with Burma's Upcoming "Landmark" Elections

 

As November 8th approaches, news and commentary about the “landmark” Burmese general elections are picking up. As usual, I have my own thoughts about the growing buzz surrounding Election Day.

Let's start off with some quick background information. The upcoming November 8th election in Burma is widely considered to be one of the most important political events in the nation’s history. The authoritarian regime, still warring with several ethnic rebel…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on September 9, 2015 at 4:00pm — 2 Comments

The Strategic Importance of U.S.-China Trade Ties

Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Barack Obama. CREDIT: U.S. Embassy The Hague (CC)

At the end of March 2015, the commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet …

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Added by Alejandro Dardik Radonski on July 22, 2015 at 1:13pm — No Comments

Political Prisoner for a Day: Why Small-Scale Crackdowns Still Work

The past week has confirmed that despite the Burmese government's made-for-export show of reforms, there is still no such thing as political freedom in Burma. Yet, you probably haven't read anything about the nation's ongoing (but increasingly repressed) student protests in this week's headlines. That's largely because the regime has responded in such a way that is threatening enough to stifle dissent at home, but not violent enough to invoke international outrage. This is the "sweet spot"…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on March 15, 2015 at 1:12am — No Comments

Why I’m Following the Burmese Student Protests, and the US Government Should Be Too

Over the past few months, the world has largely overlooked a series of peaceful protests by Burmese students that began in November, coinciding with President Obama’s visit to the Southeast Asian nation. The students are protesting the country’s new National Education Law, which maintains close, centralized government control of the nation’s educational institutions and limit students’ freedom of association (read more…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on February 13, 2015 at 12:30am — 1 Comment

Burma and the Ethics of Engagement

A question I've been grappling with lately concerns engagement with foreign governments that systematically violate human rights. When foreign governments are behaving badly, should we engage with them and try to encourage reform, or sanction them and cut off ties? Is engagement the path to reform, or does it merely reward bad behavior? While this dilemma is central to many foreign affairs situations, this post will focus on…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on December 19, 2014 at 12:30am — 6 Comments

Beijing and Hanoi must sit down and talk

The recent incidents involving China and Vietnam must not give false hopes for these two Asian nations to sit down and give each other a chance of holding a dialogue concerning territorial claims. Recent developments would instead push both parties for a peaceful co-existence in the South China Sea. Beijing and Hanoi must heed to the rule of law for the sake of maintaining peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific region.



During his visit to Manila for the World Economic Forum on…

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Added by Joselito Narciso B. Caparino on May 29, 2014 at 9:52pm — No Comments

China shouldn't skip the World Economic Forum in Manila

There are reports that Beijing will skip the World Economic Forum (WEF) on East Asia to be held 21 – 23 May 2014 in Metro Manila, Philippines. These are no surprises but China should reconsider the Forum on its broadest sense. After all, China is a key player in East Asia and the fastest growing economy in the continent.

 

The 23rd World Economic Forum on East Asia will…

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Added by Joselito Narciso B. Caparino on May 17, 2014 at 3:17am — 2 Comments

Unity amidst diversity toward 'stronger' ASEAN Community

The 24th Association of Southeast Asian Nation (ASEAN) Summit is scheduled on May 10 – 11, 2014 in Myanmar, the second largest country in Southeast Asia. It will kick off at the Myanmar International Convention Center in Nay Pyi Taw. Ten heads of states from the ASEAN will be gathered in the two-day summit with Myanmar holding the 2014 Chairmanship.

'Myanmar has set the theme for its 2014 Chairmanship of ASEAN as “Moving Forward in Unity to a Peaceful…

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Added by Joselito Narciso B. Caparino on May 9, 2014 at 7:05am — No Comments

Obama's state visit to the Philippines: re-balancing the imbalanced?

The last state visit of the United States (U.S.) President to the Philippine was in 2003. President George W. Bush became the fourth to do so after Dwight D. Eisenhower(1960) during the term of President Carlos P. Garcia; Richard M. Nixon (1969) under the administration of President Ferdinand E. Marcos; and Williman J. Clinton (1994) in President…

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Added by Joselito Narciso B. Caparino on April 26, 2014 at 4:00am — 2 Comments

Can Cities Change the Politics of Fragile States?

Discussions about how to fix fragile states usually start and end with national level politics and institutions. But what if the key to improving their condition lies…

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Added by Seth Kaplan on December 15, 2013 at 9:49pm — No Comments

Senkaku/Diaoyu Conflict Endangers U.S’s Re-balance to the Asia-Pacific

On the international level, the significance of the relationship between the United States and China is twofold. Firstly, these two nations stand alone as social and political powerhouses and secondly, they heavily depend on each other economically. The United States may have the largest military and economy, but China’s economy continues to grow at an unprecedented rate, most notably serving as the world’s greatest exporter of goods such as electrical machinery and…

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Added by Ana Martinovic on May 1, 2013 at 2:30am — No Comments

"Among a people generally corrupt, liberty cannot long exist."

“Asia must embrace the principle of inclusive growth, brining more people into the circle of opportunity that growth and development provides”

Haruhiko Kuroda, President of the Asian Development Bank

“Without civil society and without the people, from the grassroots up, anti-corruption agencies will not be able to operate efficiently.”…

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Added by Dewi Nurmayani on February 15, 2013 at 3:30pm — No Comments

Why Asia needs its own version of NATO and soon

It is easy to ignore a seemingly frivolous diplomatic incident in Asia at a time when the world’s attention is firmly invested in the Middle East, which saw the latest edition of the long-running Israeli-Palestinian saga playing out in Gaza last month. Add to that the much-vaunted economic rise of Asia in the past decade, and the Asia-Pacific region barely comes to mind as a potential flashpoint or a threat to international peace and security.



Years of breakneck economic growth in… Continue

Added by Pratyush on December 3, 2012 at 1:04pm — No Comments

The Bottom of the Pyramid: The Need to Integrate the Poor in the Growth Story: Part 1

The "fortune at the bottom of the pyramid," a phrase coined by Prahalad and Hart in 2002, led to a lot of excitement since companies were enthralled with the idea of finding new profit seeking opportunities and markets especially among the low income segment section in the developing nations. The proposition also syncs well with the first of the UN Millennium Development Goals, which call for an eradication of extreme poverty and hunger in the world—i.e., to cut down by half the…

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Added by Raji Ajwani-Ramchandani on April 6, 2012 at 4:30am — No Comments

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A Russian Take on the Kurds and U.S. Foreign Policy

A Russian defense news site declared the United States an "unreliable ally" after the the withdrawal of American troops from Northern Syria. Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev connects this characterization to the need for leaders to connect a specific policy action to a larger, understandable narrative for the American public.

The Struggle for Recognition in International Relations, with Michelle Murray

How can established powers manage the peaceful rise of new great powers? Bard's Michelle Murray offers a new answer to this perennial question, arguing that power transitions are principally social phenomena whereby rising powers struggle to obtain recognition as world powers. How can this framework help us to understand the economic and military rivalry between United States and China?

Gen Z, Climate Change Activism, & Foreign Policy, with Tatiana Serafin

Generation Z makes up over 30 percent of the world's population and this group of people, most under the age of 20, are already having an extraordinary effect on society, culture, and politics. Tatiana Serafin, journalism professor at Marymount Manhattan College, breaks down the power of this generation, focusing on climate change activism. How can they turn their energy into concrete action?

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