All Blog Posts Tagged '#democracy' (4)

Is it important to live in a Democracy?

The nature of democracy is quite simple. Only 5 words: the power of the people. But in fact, it turns out that its realization is quite problematic.

I think every person who has ever faced economic theory has heard of the principle of 20/80 (Pareto Act). In this case, its interpretation sounds like: 20 percent of the world's population possesses 80 percent of its benefits. Agree, it's not fair. We are all born in equal conditions and no one has the right to belittle our rights and…

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Added by Nadiia on November 25, 2018 at 4:32pm — No Comments

Democracy: Emancipator, Enforcer, and Exemplar

Hello my name is Christian Rodriguez and I am currently attending the University of Calgary as an undergraduate student. My major is International Relations. A special thank you to Carnegie Council for providing this opportunity!

Democracy: Emancipator, Enforcer, and Exemplar

Christian Rodriguez

Democracy is the just and liberal system that upholds the pillars of our free societies. More so than a system, it…

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Added by Christian Rodriguez on September 5, 2018 at 2:51pm — No Comments

Is it important to live in a democracy?

In the last election in Ghana, I stayed up all night glued to the television as ballot papers were counted and compiled. The excitement that heralded the announcement of the election result was palpable in my town and in every corner groups of people huddled together to discuss the possible outcome. When the results were finally announced, I was awed when I found out that the candidate I had cast my vote for was victorious. I paused to think about what had just happened; my single vote had…

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Added by Wutor Mahama Baleng on August 23, 2018 at 6:09pm — No Comments

Is it important to live in a Democracy? It depends.

Democracy -- rule by the people -- is strongly tied to human flourishing. Rule by the people results in a myriad of different government structures, but the underlying principle remains fixed: the opportunity of the governed to participate in the selection and decision-making of the governing. No two democracies are identical, but they all possess some degree of participation. Many regard democratic governance as end point of the evolution of government. Case…

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Added by Kevin Frazier on August 18, 2018 at 8:30pm — No Comments

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AI in the Arctic: Future Opportunities & Ethical Concerns, with Fritz Allhoff

How can artificial intelligence improve food security, medicine, and infrastructure in Arctic communities? What are some logistical, ethical, and governance challenges? Western Michigan's Professor Fritz Allhoff details the future of technology in this extreme environment, which is being made more accessible because of climate change. Plus he shares his thoughts on some open philosophical questions surrounding AI.

The Ethical Algorithm, with Michael Kearns

Over the course of a generation, algorithms have gone from mathematical abstractions to powerful mediators of daily life. They have made our lives more efficient, yet are increasingly encroaching on our basic rights. UPenn's Professor Michael Kearns shares some ideas on how to better embed human principles into machine code without halting the advance of data-driven scientific exploration.

Fighting ISIS Online, with Asha Castleberry-Hernandez

National security expert Asha Castleberry-Hernandez discusses what "ISIS 2.0" means and how the terrorist group has used social media to recruit and spread its message. How has its strategy changed since the death of its leader Abur Bakr al-Baghdadi? What can the U.S. military, Congress, and executive branch do better to fight the group online?

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