All Blog Posts (2,905)

Fruits of Our Labor: Organic mango cultivation by the tribal communities of South Gujarat (India)

"Fruits of Our Labor," published in Policy Innovations, describes the symbiotic arrangement between the tribal communities of South Gujarat (India) and the fast moving consumer product company ITC for organic mango cultivation. ITC picked up the cost of…

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Added by Raji Ajwani-Ramchandani on April 29, 2012 at 2:00pm — No Comments

The Global New Progressive Movement

I've been reading the new "Voices from the Global Spring" collection edited by Anya Schiffrin and Eamon Kircher-Allen. It is a country-by-country account of recent activism, stretching from Cairo to lower Manhattan. In the foreword, Jeffrey Sachs outlines what he calls a "global new progressive…

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Added by Evan O'Neil on April 25, 2012 at 4:30pm — No Comments

Cuba and Drugs Dominate the Sixth Summit of the Americas

The sixth Summit of the Americas took place in Cartagena, Colombia on April 14–15 and raised some interesting questions about the future of U.S. policies in the region.

Global drug policy appeared to dominate center stage as the American "war on drugs" was criticized for its lack of evident success. Guatemalan President Otto Perez Molina encouraged the introduction of global drug…

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Added by Sarah Aston on April 24, 2012 at 10:00am — No Comments

Selection versus Election: A Wasted Opportunity at the World Bank?

The announcement on April 16 that U.S.-backed Jim Yong Kim had been named president of the World Bank came as no surprise to the world as it repeated the decades-old pattern of an American holding the office. The selection process raises important questions that the World Bank needs to address.

Democracy in the twenty-first century dictates that institutions should be…

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Added by Carnegie Council on April 17, 2012 at 3:30pm — 1 Comment

Why a Focus on Inequality in Fragile States Is Wrong

With the appointment of the United Kingdom’s prime minister, David Cameron, as chair of a new UN committee tasked with establishing a new set of UN millennium development goals (the existing ones expire in 2015), debate on the issue is expected to heat up in the months ahead.

Many in the development field…

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Added by Seth Kaplan on April 16, 2012 at 5:30pm — No Comments

What is America's number one geopolitical foe?

Last month, Mitt Romney called Russia America's number one geopolitical foe, sparking people to ask if such a thing really existed. It sounded like Romney was trying to bring back the Cold War or his understanding of foreign policy hasn’t evolved since then.

The number one geopolitical challenge to the United States right now is the sour, partisan, retrograde politics in Washington itself. The United States remains by far the most influential country in the world, but this position is…

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Added by Devin Stewart on April 6, 2012 at 9:30am — 1 Comment

The Bottom of the Pyramid: The Need to Integrate the Poor in the Growth Story: Part 1

The "fortune at the bottom of the pyramid," a phrase coined by Prahalad and Hart in 2002, led to a lot of excitement since companies were enthralled with the idea of finding new profit seeking opportunities and markets especially among the low income segment section in the developing nations. The proposition also syncs well with the first of the UN Millennium Development Goals, which call for an eradication of extreme poverty and hunger in the world—i.e., to cut down by half the…

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Added by Raji Ajwani-Ramchandani on April 6, 2012 at 4:30am — No Comments

Is it Time to Bail Out Battlefield Journalists?

Homs, a city of 823,000 in the western Syria is one of the flash points for the year-old uprising against Bashar al-Assad's regime and it is also the most dangerous place in the world for journalists. Between February 22 and 24, four journalists were killed in the city due to shelling from Syrian government forces. Venerated American Sunday Times of London journalist Marie Colvin and French photojournalist Rémi Ochlik have taken up most of the…

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Added by Alex Woodson on April 5, 2012 at 1:00pm — No Comments

North Korea: Witness to Transformation Weekly Blog Update April 4th

In this blog, we report on developments in and around North Korea, including the broader security setting and political, economic and social change in the country.

Marcus Noland: Deputy Director & Senior Fellow Peterson Institute for International Economics

Stephan Haggard: Lawrence and Sallye Krause Professor at the University of California, San Diego Graduate…

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Added by Alex Melton on April 4, 2012 at 3:58pm — No Comments

Are Values a Lost Cause?

It was with keen interest and mixed feelings that I read the recent commentary by Greg Smith, the Goldman Sachs executive who resigned with a flourish on March 14, publishing his reasons in the New York Times. He argues that a "toxic" culture has…

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Added by Mary Gentile on March 30, 2012 at 5:00pm — No Comments

Business Ethics Training

Many global corporations now incorporate ethics training into their compliance programs as they recognise the need to establish a culture where people do the right thing because the know and understand it is the right thing, rather than because a book of rules says it is.

Ethics training is designed to assist employees and managers to recognise the essentially human behavior that shapes cultural challenges and business imperatives and decide how decisions are made. It is designed to…

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Added by Dr Attracta Lagan on March 28, 2012 at 10:00pm — No Comments

Ethics and War in Homer's Iliad

I gave this talk at the annual Maine Humanities Council Winter Weekend Seminar, at Bowdoin College, earlier this month. I look forward to your thoughts. 

When I was in 9th grade, confronting the Iliad for the first time, I had two questions. First, why is it so important that…

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Added by Joel Rosenthal on March 28, 2012 at 4:07pm — 1 Comment

A New World Order Is Born in Syria

"We may be witnessing in Syria the first example of a new global diplomatic process to end a conflict, protect civilians, and instigate democratic political reforms within a sovereign country in a manner that is at once legitimate, credible and effective,"…

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Added by Carnegie Council on March 28, 2012 at 2:40pm — No Comments

The Iran Sanctions Experiment by Marcus Noland and Stephan Haggard

Sanctions are a complex technology with correspondingly complex macro- and microeconomic as well as political effects. Iran is currently facing quite draconian oil-related sanctions, most notably the EU decision in January 2012, to wind down purchases of Iranian crude oil by July 1, 2012. But the country has also been hit by a wave of complex financial sanctions that may be of interest to North Korean watchers; we focus on those here although their effects will be compounded by the squeeze…

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Added by Alex Melton on March 28, 2012 at 11:32am — No Comments

North Korea: Witness to Transformation Weekly Blog Update March 26th

In this blog, we report on developments in and around North Korea, including the broader security setting and political, economic and social change in the country.

Marcus Noland: Deputy Director & Senior Fellow Peterson Institute for International Economics

Stephan Haggard: Lawrence and Sallye Krause Professor at the University of California, San Diego Graduate…

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Added by Alex Melton on March 26, 2012 at 10:57am — No Comments

World Water Day: Selected Stories from Policy Innovations

In honor of World Water Day, I compiled some of our top water stories, videos, and reports from Policy Innovations magazine:

STORIES

Global Water Crisis: Selected Resources from Carnegie Council

The need for adequate, affordable drinking and irrigation water is a growing international crisis. Carnegie Council presents a collection of materials on…

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Added by Evan O'Neil on March 22, 2012 at 5:36pm — No Comments

BOOK REVIEW: The Practice of Global Citizenship

From our latest issue of Ethics & International Affairs:

The Practice of Global Citizenship, Luis Cabrera (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), 314 pp., $90 cloth, $31.99 paper.

Mark Gibney (Reviewer)

Human rights are (universally) declared to be universal, yet we continue to live in a world where it is seemingly quite natural to limit human rights obligations to a state's own territorial borders. No…

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Added by Carnegie Council on March 22, 2012 at 3:20pm — No Comments

North Korea: Witness to Transformation Weekly Blog Update March 16th

In this blog, we report on developments in and around North Korea, including the broader security setting and political, economic and social change in the country.

Marcus Noland: Deputy Director & Senior Fellow Peterson Institute for International Economics

Stephan Haggard: Lawrence and Sallye Krause Professor at the University of California, San Diego Graduate…

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Added by Alex Melton on March 20, 2012 at 6:19pm — No Comments

Kony Kony Kony Has Done It Again

Kony. Kony. Kony. It was hard to get the word out of my head last week after Invisible Children released a movie with the intention of making the brutal warlord Joseph Kony "famous." Pundits lined up to take their…

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Added by Evan O'Neil on March 13, 2012 at 6:32pm — No Comments

In a G-Zero World, It's Every Nation for Itself

"This book is not about the decline of the West," political scientist Ian Bremmer assures us in the introduction of his new book. "Nor is this a book about the rise of China and other emerging markets." Well, that's a relief.

Many pundits are giddily predicting the end of American preeminence and China's inevitable domination, but we have all seen that movie before.…

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Added by Devin Stewart on March 12, 2012 at 12:00pm — No Comments

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Facing a Pandemic in the Dark

Over 1 million Rohingya refugees living in crowded, unsanitary conditions in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh could soon be facing their own COVID-19 outbreak. Making their situation even more desperate is an Internet blockade, meaning they don't have access to life-saving information, writes Rohingya activist and educator Razia Sultana. How can international organizations help?

Hungary and the Values Test

In the wake of the Hungarian parliament's vote to allow the executive to rule by decree, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev reflects on the call by some to expel Hungary from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization--on the grounds that the country no longer upholds the liberal-democratic values that should form the basis of the security association.

The Coronavirus Pandemic & International Relations, with Nikolas Gvosdev

With the COVID-19 pandemic disrupting all aspects of daily life around the world, what will be the effect on international relations? Will it increase cooperation among nations, or will it lead to more conflict and competition? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev and host Alex Woodson discuss these scenarios and also touch on how the virus has affected the Democratic primary, in which Joe Biden now has a commanding lead.

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