Featured Blog Posts – March 2013 Archive (19)

Social Covenants: The Missing Ingredient in State Building Efforts

Political theorists have for the most part focused on the state when thinking about how to make countries work better for their populations. This has naturally led to a concern with…

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Added by Seth Kaplan on March 31, 2013 at 12:56pm — No Comments

Do partisan considerations alter how international law is perceived?

The intricate link binding international law and international relations make the inclusion of objectivity in legal allegiances a difficult task. This is particularly evidenced in the Iraq War that began on March 19, 2003. An invasion spearheaded by the United States, the United Kingdom and their Coalition partners, there have been plenty of moments in the trials and inquiries that reveal a continuing allegiance coloured by partisan considerations.

The Chilcot Iraq Inquiry in London…

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Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on March 30, 2013 at 1:59am — No Comments

Thought Leader: Mary Robinson

As part of the Carnegie Council Centennial Thought Leaders Forum, Carnegie Council's Devin Stewart spoke with Mary Robinson, former president of Ireland, and a former UN high commissioner for Human Rights. She is currently chancellor of the University of Dublin (Trinity College) and president of the Mary Robinson Foundation -…

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Added by Carnegie Council on March 28, 2013 at 11:30am — No Comments

North Korea Witness to Transformation Weekly Update Mar 28th

In this blog, we report on developments in and around North Korea, including the broader security setting and political, economic and social change in the country.

Marcus Noland: Deputy Director & Senior Fellow Peterson Institute for International Economics

Stephan Haggard: Lawrence and Sallye Krause Professor at the University of California, San Diego Graduate…

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Added by Alex Melton on March 28, 2013 at 10:19am — No Comments

Should the U.S. Military Promote Democracy?

The U.S. military doesn’t exactly have a perfect record when it comes to promoting democracy. Too often national interests – security, oil – have been given primacy over democratic values and human rights. The legacy of the Bush administrations has severely tainted the phrase democracy promotion and lead to a justified suspicion about promoting democracy by military force. However, the idea that the U.S. military should play a leading role in promoting democracy is far from…

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Added by Rasmus Sinding Søndergaard on March 26, 2013 at 7:00am — No Comments

People Power is Alive and Well (by Srdja Popovic)

I thought I would share this optimistic blog post on the effect of the 'global people power revolution' in 2011 by Srdja Popovic - Executive director at Centre for Applied Nonviolent Actions and Strategies.

"Even as critics discuss and argue over the success or failure of these protests, I nevertheless see a paradigm shift. People have been awakened and are understanding power and obedience not in monolithic terms – where the head of state has top-down control that should…

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Added by Rasmus Sinding Søndergaard on March 25, 2013 at 4:30am — No Comments

To what extent?

The reason that most scholars attribute to the “failure” of International Law, is that it is purely consent based. Treaties that bind a state through its consent, ratification and accession alone can be invoked against it. Customary norms that a state does not persistently or subsequently object to are the only things that bind it. Judicial decisions do not hold sway with the principle of stare decisis, as they bind only those states that are party to it. Any source of law, therefore, is…

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Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on March 24, 2013 at 2:10am — No Comments

DR Congo's Bosco Ntaganda in ICC Custody

From BBC News on 3/22/13:

"Congolese war crimes suspect Bosco Ntaganda has left Rwanda and is on the way to The Hague in the custody of the International Criminal Court.

Gen Ntaganda, a key figure in the conflict in…

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Added by Ashleigh Long on March 22, 2013 at 2:30pm — No Comments

Why We Value Democracy

In this post, I would like to explore the widely shared intuition that Nahuel mentions in his post on Global Ethics and Democracy.

Presumably the underlying assumption of Nahuel's intuition, "that democracy is the only legitimate political authority," is that democracy is just, and justice is good. But is that good enough? Why are we happier…

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Added by Linda Eggert on March 21, 2013 at 5:40am — No Comments

Living with Difference

Can there be any "difference" bigger than this?? This picture gives a very strong message to all human beings. Two greatest enemies of each-other, brought together by a human, became friends and now are close friends. We human-beings must learn to live like a family and friends on this planet. Fighting must be replaced by sacrifices for saving the lives of our fellow humans.

This picture was taken on my field visit to a village in Maharashtra(India).

Name- Gaurav Dhankar…

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Added by Gaurav Dhankar on March 20, 2013 at 11:30am — No Comments

Iraq: Is Religious Sectarianism a Fatal Flaw?

The consequence on American economy has been far reaching. In 2011, the Watson Institute at Brown University estimated the cost of U.S. wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan to $3.2 to $4 trillion. Sure, removing Hussein created the conditions for democracy but Iraq is divided by sectarian politics, crippled by violence,…

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Added by Jocelyne Cesari on March 20, 2013 at 11:00am — No Comments

Russian Nationalism in Stavropol

Laws against Hijab in Stavropol Russia

Stavropol has made the news as of late with its rise in traditional Russian nationalism that has put its crosshairs on the minority Muslim population in the area. Although the area is determined to be approximately 80% ethnic Russian and muslims taking…

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Added by Richard Byington on March 20, 2013 at 10:52am — 4 Comments

Is China Taking the Right Cues From History?

Now that China's leadership transition has been completed, its new president Xi Jinping faces numerous challenges, from maintaining economic growth to combating corruption, pollution, and food supply scandals. Yet disagreement has been stirring on the best path to achieve…

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Added by Devin Stewart on March 20, 2013 at 10:30am — No Comments

Droning on

Drones were set out to be a means to avoid collateral damage, but their practical use shows otherwise. While drone strikes are effective in eliminating targets, too many drone attacks without reprieve can incite several political repercussions: by actually making as many terrorists as they kill and by altering perceptions towards the United States – which is increasingly rubbing the people of Pakistan and Yemen (among others) on the wrong side – in the process risking the creation of more…

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Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on March 17, 2013 at 1:10am — 13 Comments

The Slow Climb

Two years since the revolution began, the war is still raging in Syria. On February 12, though, a breakthrough came about when an airfield near Aleppo was captured by a rebel group. For the first time, rebels were able to seize usable warplanes. This not only signifies a triumph on their part, but also marks a change in their approach – as battles in cities have now shifted to attacks on military bases.

About a month ago, rebels in Syria had captured the Taftanaz airfield in northern…

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Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on March 10, 2013 at 1:30am — No Comments

Amplify, Connect, Explore: UNHCR Innovation

This week, I bring to you an interview with Rocco Nuri, Communications Officer at UNHCR Nairobi, Kenya and a member of the recently launched UNHCR Innovation iTeam. Rocco talks to us about the importance and relevance of innovation in improving refugee livelihoods, the activities of UNHCR Innovation and more! 

1.   When and how did the idea for UNHCR Innovation first develop?

UNHCR…

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Added by Neha Bhat on March 9, 2013 at 1:21pm — No Comments

Petition Your College for Sustainability

A group of students at my alma mater in Minnesota have created an online petition and campaign demanding that the college adhere to its proclaimed sustainability vision. Arguing that its current plan is too opaque, they are asking the college to set transparent and measurable goals, and to give students insight into the progress toward attaining them.…

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Added by Andreas Rekdal on March 6, 2013 at 6:30pm — No Comments

Looking for Contest Partner

hi everyone, my name is Lang, I comes from Viet Nam,I want to participate in the contest with the hope to expand the…

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Added by nguyen thi phuong lang on March 6, 2013 at 3:30am — No Comments

Thought Leader: Dan Ariely

DEVIN STEWART: Dr. Ariely, it's so good to have you here today.

When you look at the world today, how do you see the world? How would you describe it, particularly from a moral perspective?

DAN ARIELY: I think morality has a few elements to it. It's a real struggle between what's good for me and…

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Added by Carnegie Council on March 4, 2013 at 5:30pm — 2 Comments

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Marlene Laruelle on Europe's Far-Right Political Movements

What has led to the rise of far-right parties across Europe and how have they evolved over time? Is immigration really the main issue, or is there a more complex set of problems that vary from nation to nation? What are the idealogical and practical connections between the far right and Russia? Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Marlene Laruelle is an expert on Europe, Russia, Eurasia, and Europe's far right. Don't miss her analysis.

Global Ethics Forum Preview: From the White House to the World with Chef Sam Kass

Next time on Global Ethics Forum, Sam Kass details his time as President Obama’s White House chef and senior policy advisor for nutrition and the links between climate change and how and what we eat. In this excerpt, Kass and journalist Roxana Saberi discuss an uncertain future for food policy in the United States under Trump.

The Rohingya Crisis: "Myanmar's Enemy Within" with Francis Wade

Francis Wade, author of "The Enemy Within," a new book on the Rohingya crisis in Burma, explains the historical background to the persecution of the Muslim Rohingya minority and gives a first-hand account of the terrible situation now. Has democracy been good for Burma? Will some Rohingya refugees become Islamic extremists?

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