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Latest Activity

Carnegie Council and iGEM_TAS are now friends
Apr 12, 2017
iGEM_TAS posted a photo

Team photo

This is the team photo for the 2017 Taipei American School iGEM team!
Apr 7, 2017
iGEM_TAS liked Carnegie Council's blog post Ethics, International Relations, and Global Environmental Governance
Apr 7, 2017
iGEM_TAS is now a member of Global Ethics Network
Apr 5, 2017

Profile Information

Organization
Taipei American School
What are your interests and areas of expertise in international relations?
Environment, Ethics, Health, Science, Sustainability, Technology
Tell everyone a little about yourself and what you hope to gain from the Global Ethics Network.
We are the 2017 Taipei American School iGEM Team. iGEM (International Genetically Engineered Machines) is an international genetic engineering competition that is open to both undergraduate and high school students interested in the field of synthetic biology. Our project is focused on cleaning up nanoparticle waste in wastewater treatment systems, and as a part of our Human Practice component for the tournament, we aim to explore key topics in bioethics. Specifically, we are interested in existing international chemical substance regulations, ethics concerns consumers may have, and how governments and industries can collaborate in implementing new technologies (such as nanoparticles). Through this forum, we hope to receive a diversity of opinions and perspectives on this issue to provide us with further insight. Our goal is to produce a policy paper that aims to regulate nanoparticle usage, address the disparity between emerging technologies and international law, and address bioethics concerns related to not only our prototype but to nanoparticles in general as well.

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At 6:35am on June 12, 2017, Kayi Mivedor said…

Good day,

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Have a nice day.
Mr.Tidiane

 
 
 

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