Vasilis Trigkas
  • Male
  • Beijing
  • China
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Profile Information

Website
http://www.carnegietsinghua.org
Job Title
Program & Research Assistant in Sino-EU affairs (Global Intern Program)
Organization
Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy
What are your interests and areas of expertise in international relations?
Cities, Culture, Diplomacy, Economy, Education, Ethics, Globalization, Governance, Innovation, Peace, Reconciliation, Religion, Security, Sustainability, Technology, Trade, War
Tell everyone a little about yourself and what you hope to gain from the Global Ethics Network.
The peaceful relationship between a rising power, China, and a status quo power, the United States, is a global public good. It is thus an obligation of each and every student, scholar or diplomat to contribute through his/her own position and lead these two countries into a peaceful osmosis. After all these two great civilisations are based on a spirit that highly appraises knowledge and looks to individuals as an end rather than as a means to an end. A contemporary political divergence should not cancel a deeper convergence of civilisational principles.

Vasilis Trigkas's Blog

President Xi at the Lincoln Memorial: A Game Changer for China-U.S Relations?

Posted on July 20, 2015 at 12:36am 2 Comments

More than 2000 years ago, in his classic text History of the Peloponnesian War, the Athenian historian Thucydides insightfully declared that interest, honor, and fear propel nations into destructive wars. As the interest-based approach in China-U.S. relations is threatened by rising trade protectionism, …

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Germany Between Demosthenes and Isocrates*

Posted on April 13, 2015 at 10:58am 0 Comments

By Vasilis Trigkas

In the 4th century BC Macedonia, a Greek-speaking kingdom of Northern Greece, under the leadership of Phillip II, set out to unify the Mediterranean World. Macedonia’s quest for hegemonic stability brought her into a direct conflict with old established Hellenic powers like Thebes, Sparta and most of all Athens. 

By the mid 4th century BC Athens had recovered from the disastrous defeat of the Peloponnesian war. The resilient Athenians…

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Can China and the US Neutralize the Ring of Gyges?*

Posted on November 30, 2014 at 9:30am 1 Comment

Plato foresaw how the technological imperative can risk a fragile peace.

We shall have to share out the fruits of technology among the whole of mankind. The notion that the direct and immediate producers of the fruits of technology have a proprietary right to these fruits will have to be forgotten. …

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US-China-Japan: Beware the ‘Megarian Trap’

Posted on October 5, 2014 at 4:57pm 1 Comment

Originally Published at http://thediplomat.com/2014/10/us-china-japan-beware-the-megarian-trap/

“That decision may be judged irrational or merely a miscalculation of likely consequences, but it is like many similar ones throughout history in which passion inspired by old hatreds and wounded honor are the cause of dangerous actions.”…

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Carnegie Council

A Russian Take on the Kurds and U.S. Foreign Policy

A Russian defense news site declared the United States an "unreliable ally" after the the withdrawal of American troops from Northern Syria. Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev connects this characterization to the need for leaders to connect a specific policy action to a larger, understandable narrative for the American public.

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