Ugboja Onuche Gideon
  • Male
  • Ikeja, Lagos state.
  • Nigeria
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Ugboja Onuche Gideon's Friends

  • Paul E Ferrante, CFA, CFP
  • Nguyen Trang
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Ugboja Onuche Gideon's Page

Profile Information

Website
http://www.naijastudentsclub.org.ng
Job Title
CEO
Organization
Naija students club
What are your interests and areas of expertise in international relations?
Business, Cities, Communication, Culture, Democracy, Development, Diplomacy, Economy, Education, Environment, Ethics, Finance, Food, Gender, Globalization, Governance, Health, Human Rights, Innovation, Labor, Peace, Poverty, Reconciliation, Religion, Science, Security, Sustainability, Technology, Trade, Transportation, Youth
Tell everyone a little about yourself and what you hope to gain from the Global Ethics Network.
I am an individual who loves unity. I also hope to get inspired via different subjects here on global ethics network (GEN).

Ugboja Onuche Gideon's Photos

Ugboja Onuche Gideon's Blog

EFFECTS OF JOBS THREAT IN AFRICA'S GOVERNMENTS TODAY: USING NIGERIA AS AN EXAMPLE.

Posted on May 3, 2017 at 2:04pm 0 Comments

In a world where government inequitable allocation of human resources escalate more and more often each day, we find ourselves living in an age where job opportunities generally are decreasing while economic problems are increasing.





It is seemly an awkward progression. Africa's unemployed persons today are living on the street, some frustrated and deprived of their right to humanity; in a situation whereby government enacted laws are taken for granted by government agencies… Continue

#betterfuturecontest

Posted on January 1, 2015 at 9:58am 0 Comments

WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE HAPPEN DURING THIS CENTURY TO MAKE THE WORLD A BETTER PLACE.



There is nothing quite like seeing this century fulfilling a better future, longed to be fulfilled in the past century. The act of struggles gives way to resolve perplexed state of this world. Hopelessness of this very time pose my mind to think the criteria to make the world a better place.



First of all, the consistency of intergovernmental cooperation among nations is lost. I think… Continue

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At 10:57am on December 31, 2014, Al LeBlanc said…

Doing "well" - Looking forward to New Year !  Best Wishes for 2015 ! Al

 
 
 

Carnegie Council

The Narrative IS Changing . . .

The narrative about America's role in the world is changing--and more evidence is accumulating that suggests that no matter how the 2020 presidential and Congressional elections turn out, there is no turning the clock back to a pre-2016 status quo.

The Crack-Up: The 1919 Race Riots & the Crucible of Chicago, with Adam Green

During the "Red Summer" of 1919 dozens of race riots flared up across the U.S., but the anti-African American violence in Chicago stood out because of scale and social and political significance. University of Chicago's Professor Adam Green details the causes, the tragic events, and the aftermath in this riveting discussion. How did the riot affect the city's development for decades to come? How does it tie into questions about democracy and the end of World War I?

Ethics & International Affairs Volume 33.3 (Fall 2019)

The highlight of the Fall 2019 issue of "Ethics & International Affairs" is a roundtable on "Economic Sanctions and Their Consequences." Other topics include human rights and conflict resolution, Afghan attitudes toward civilian wartime harm, the role of supererogation on the battlefield, and the ethics of not-so-civil resistance.

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