Travis Gidado
  • Male
  • New York, NY
  • United States
Share on Facebook
Share

Travis Gidado's Friends

  • MrEditor GlobalEthix
  • Evan O'Neil
  • Carnegie Council

Travis Gidado's Groups

 

Travis Gidado's Page

Profile Information

Job Title
Analyst
What are your interests and areas of expertise in international relations?
Business, Culture, Democracy, Development, Diplomacy, Economy, Ethics, Globalization, Governance, Innovation, Migration, Religion, Security, Technology, Transportation, War
Tell everyone a little about yourself and what you hope to gain from the Global Ethics Network.
My name is Travis Gidado, and I'm a recent graduate of Yale University with a degree in Ethics, Politics and Economics. I currently work for an investment bank in New York City, focusing on corporate governance and legal matters. My interests range from the implications of globalization on culture and identity formation, to the impact of technological change on the global public sphere. I hope to use this forum as an outlet for exploring these topics and many others.

Travis Gidado's Blog

"The Petraeus Affair": A question of ethics, or of risk?

Posted on November 20, 2012 at 9:00pm 0 Comments

When news broke about "the Petraeus Affair" (as it has been deemed in many circles), my immediate reaction was one of sadness. Petraeus established himself as perhaps the most prominent example of an academic who could bridge the gap between theory and practice in a nation that recoils at the sight of most would-be leaders brandishing three letters: Ph.D. (For example, when I hear detractors refer to President Obama as overly “professorial” even though his most traditionally academic…

Continue

On Perpetual Peace

Posted on November 4, 2012 at 9:00pm 0 Comments

If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood

Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,

Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud

Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,

My friend, you would not tell with such high zest

To children ardent for some desperate glory,

The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est

Pro patria mori.

From “Dulce Est Decorum Est,” by Wilfred Owen…

Continue

Comment Wall (1 comment)

You need to be a member of Global Ethics Network to add comments!

Join Global Ethics Network

At 9:41am on April 13, 2013, Suresh Kumar Sharma said…

 
 
 

Carnegie Council

Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, with Larry Diamond

Larry Diamond's core argument is stark: the defense and advancement of democratic ideals relies on U.S. global leadership. If the U.S. does not reclaim its traditional place as the keystone of democracy, today's authoritarian trend could become a tsunami that could provide an opening for Vladimir Putin, Xi Jinping, and their admirers to turn the 21st century into a dark time of surging authoritarianism.

Global Ethics Weekly: Foreign Policy & the 2020 Democratic Candidates, with Nikolas Gvosdev

Will Joe Biden's "restorationist" foreign policy resonate with voters? What would a "progressive" approach to international relations look like for Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders? What role will foreign policy play in the 2020 Election? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev looks at these questions and more as he and host Alex Woodson discuss a crowded 2020 Democratic primary field.

The Crack-Up: A Hundred Years of Student Protests in China, with Jeffrey Wasserstrom

In the latest "Crack-Up" podcast, China expert Jeffrey Wasserstrom discusses the rich history of Chinese student protests. From the May Fourth movement in 1919 to Tiananmen Square in 1989 to today's mass demonstrations in Hong Kong, what are the threads that tie these moments together? Don't miss this fascinating talk, which also touches on Woodrow Wilson, the Russian Revolution, and a young Mao Zedong.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

VIDEOS

SUPPORT US

GEO-GOVERNANCE MATTERS

© 2019   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service


The views and opinions expressed in the media, comments, or publications on this website are those of the speakers or authors and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Carnegie Council.