Oumie Sissokho
  • Female
  • Taipei
  • Taiwan
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Profile Information

Website
http://impis.nccu.edu.tw/~IMPIS/intro/pages.php?ID=intro1
Job Title
Student
Organization
National Chengchi University
What are your interests and areas of expertise in international relations?
Education, Ethics, Gender, Health, Human Rights, Peace, Poverty, Youth
Tell everyone a little about yourself and what you hope to gain from the Global Ethics Network.
I have been a human rights advocate in my country for about a decade now, working with key vulnerable populations such as women, children and in some cases youth (generally). I have paid special attention in issues affecting the well-being of the girl child ranging from low educational opportunities, health rights to the discouragement of harmful practices such as early and forceful marriages.
I wish to network more with people from different backgrounds from the Global Ethic Network to learn about emerging solutions in my areas of advocacy (and beyond), improving my communication skills and getting more familiar about ethics for human development.

Oumie Sissokho's Blog

Reaction Paper 5 of the EFF course

Posted on September 4, 2014 at 11:46am 0 Comments

For this section’s reflection, I will focus on only few questions provided in the syllabus both due to space and time. In the EU report, three key trends: individual advancement and empowerment through education; dwindled global resources; and a greater sense of belonging to a global community are emphasized. In addition, topics such as widening of the middle class, advanced access to information and the internet are highlighted. Just like the NIC report, it also raises concerns about the…

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Reaction Paper 4 for the EFF Course

Posted on August 20, 2014 at 12:26am 0 Comments

Nguyen in section four raises an important issue about biasness in the selection of sources or subjects which could have serious implications on our work about the future. Prediction, especially in a world where uncertainty and of course greater understanding of possible incidents exist side by side, it is necessary for states and other actors to become more prepared in responding to needs such as security and financial stability. In addition, it also helps us to prepare for calamities that…

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Reaction Paper on Section 3 of the EFF course on Of all Possible Future Worlds

Posted on August 15, 2014 at 2:07pm 0 Comments

There is an intense debate about the possibility of global peace and security when the peoples of the world, through communities, states and institutions have common goals and ambitions. It is true that peace, security and stability are some of the most fundamental things that enable humans to thrive whether in politics or economics. However, man has almost always been indulged in competition, whether for socio-economic resources, cultural or political gains. This competition indeed is…

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The Outreach on the Boko Haram Abduction of the Chibok School Girls

Posted on June 10, 2014 at 8:45am 4 Comments

As a women’s rights activist, I deem it necessary to provide an opportunity or platform to talk about the current sad incident happening in Nigeria. I am doing this discussion with a Nigerian, living in Abuja, Nigeria. She works in Sexual Reproductive Health and Development fields for young people, especially, women and girls in her region. I met Kikelomo through the Women Deliver when we were both awarded the 100…

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