Diana Skelton
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  • France
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Diana Skelton's Discussions

The live below the line challenge

Started this discussion. Last reply by Valentine Olushola Oyedipe Apr 21, 2015. 3 Replies

What do you think of the live #BelowTheLine challenge? My daughter is going to live with less than $1.50 a day to raise…Continue

Tags: hunger, refugees

 

Diana Skelton's Page

Profile Information

Website
http://togetherindignity.wordpress.com/
Job Title
Deputy Director General
Organization
All Together in Dignity/ATD Fourth World
What are your interests and areas of expertise in international relations?
Aid, Democracy, Development, Governance, Human Rights, Peace, Poverty
Tell everyone a little about yourself and what you hope to gain from the Global Ethics Network.
My work is with people and families living in extreme poverty in many countries. Their experience of solidarity and intelligence in human relations can help all of us to build a more ethical world.

“Why Me?” – When a Bird’s Nest is Broken

In western Europe and North America, social services continue to remove many children from the care of loving, non-abusive parents because of poverty. Again and again, adults who experienced this as children tell us of regrets and frustrations that haunt them. While the goal of social services is to protect these children’s future, they seem to have no understanding of the harm that can be done by breaking families apart. On other continents where public social services cannot afford this approach, it is sometimes imported by international non-profit organizations, some of whose main goal is to find children who can be adopted in other countries.

Read more at:

http://togetherindignity.wordpress.com/2014/04/15/why-me-when-a-birds-nest-is-broken/

Diana Skelton's Photos

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At 5:47am on September 20, 2019, Alexandria Guerrero said…
I have something very vital to disclose to you,please kindly  get back to me via my private email:(alexandriaguerrero55@gmail.com) for more  details Thanks 
Alexandria Guerrero
At 5:46am on September 20, 2019, Alexandria Guerrero said…
I have something very vital to disclose to you,please kindly  get back to me via my private email:(alexandriaguerrero55@gmail.com) for more  details Thanks 
Alexandria Guerrero

Diana Skelton's Videos

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Diana Skelton's Blog

Poverty, Powder Kegs, and Stereotypes

Posted on July 29, 2015 at 9:57am 0 Comments

Have you ever heard it said that “poverty is a powder keg”? That image has been used by leaders like Bill Clinton and Desmond Tutu in an attempt to spur society to overcome poverty — a worthy goal. But unfortunately that same image feeds the stereotype of the poor as violent, dangerous, and undeserving of help. In every country, this prejudice leads society to distrust the homeless, beggars, or street children.…



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Advocating for Better Humanitarian Aid

Posted on April 9, 2015 at 11:07am 0 Comments

The United Nations is planning a World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) — scheduled for May 2016 in Istanbul — in order to improve the effectiveness of aid to victims of both armed conflicts and…

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Judgment and Longing to Belong

Posted on February 12, 2015 at 4:16am 0 Comments

I really should have known better.

A few days ago, I was chatting with a French friend of mine. When our conversation turned to the Charlie Hebdo shootings, I began reeling off questions—when she lost her temper with me.

“You’re piling on!”

“But I was only asking questions! There are so many things about France that I don’t understand well…

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When Elephants Fight: Why We Need More Sustainable Community Organizing

Posted on October 15, 2014 at 6:14am 0 Comments

“Why are you wasting time by reaching out to people who can’t be bothered to come to meetings, or who don’t dare open their mouths? You’re bottom-dragging.”

I was shocked when I heard the words “bottom-dragging,” a terribly insulting way to refer to efforts to connect people with one another. The questions, asked of us by the…

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Carnegie Council

The Crack-Up: Dwight Eisenhower & the Road Trip that Changed America, with Brian C. Black

In 1919, a young Army officer named Dwight Eisenhower, along with a "Mad Max"-style military convoy, set out on a cross-country road trip to examine the nascent state of America's roads. Penn State Altoona's Professor Brian C. Black explains how this trip influenced Eisenhower's decisions decades later, both as general and president, and laid the groundwork for the rise of petroleum-based engines and the interstate highway system.

AI in the Arctic: Future Opportunities & Ethical Concerns, with Fritz Allhoff

How can artificial intelligence improve food security, medicine, and infrastructure in Arctic communities? What are some logistical, ethical, and governance challenges? Western Michigan's Professor Fritz Allhoff details the future of technology in this extreme environment, which is being made more accessible because of climate change. Plus he shares his thoughts on some open philosophical questions surrounding AI.

The Ethical Algorithm, with Michael Kearns

Over the course of a generation, algorithms have gone from mathematical abstractions to powerful mediators of daily life. They have made our lives more efficient, yet are increasingly encroaching on our basic rights. UPenn's Professor Michael Kearns shares some ideas on how to better embed human principles into machine code without halting the advance of data-driven scientific exploration.

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