“My kitchen plays a triple role. First of all, I use my kitchen to prepare food with the burning of wood, secondly to keep chicken and to keep myself warm especially during the dry harmattan cold and also drying crops I harvest from the farms including corn and beans. When I cook my food, there is much heat produced and I have constructed a chicken pen so that it benefits from the heat from the cooking of my food. In this household, the heat from the fireside is used to cook the meals and the remnant heat serves to heat the chicken pen and dry the maize before threshing”. Mukam Henry, Village Head Munam Village

Although it can be posited that the significant burning of biomass for heating and drying contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions and thus the climate change phenomenon, the communities interviewed assert that these traditionally constructed kitchens and barns, using locally available materials serves a trap for the smoke generated from burning. Significant amount of the smoke and soot is trapped by the materials most made of bamboos and pegs. Farmers assert that they have scrapped accumulated mixture and this has served as local medicine for various common ailments including stomach aches and healing of sores

Tags: #photo2017
Albums: Eric Ngang
Location: Bamenda

Comment

You need to be a member of Global Ethics Network to add comments!

Join Global Ethics Network

Carnegie Council

Rischian Transactionalism

Transactionalism in U.S. foreign policy has a new proponent: James E. Risch, incoming chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

The Crack-Up: Prohibition, Immigration, & the Klan, with Lisa McGirr

In the second podcast in The Crack-Up series, which looks at how 1919 shaped the modern world, historian Ted Widmer talks to Harvard's Professor Lisa McGirr about Prohibition's roots in anti-immigrant sentiment and its enforcement, in some cases, by the Ku Klux Klan. Plus, they discuss the Eighteenth Amendment's connections to World War I and the rise of the modern American state.

After Katowice: Three Civil Society Strategies for Ratcheting Up Climate Ambition

The recent climate conference in Katowice, Poland was a milestone for the Paris Agreement, and it points to the role NGOs can play in encouraging states to ratchet up climate ambition.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

VIDEOS

SUPPORT US

GEO-GOVERNANCE MATTERS

© 2019   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service


The views and opinions expressed in the media, comments, or publications on this website are those of the speakers or authors and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Carnegie Council.