About GLOBAL ETHICS NETWORK

We live in an increasingly connected world.

But conflicts persist and finding moral common ground requires communication and collaboration, both virtual and face-to-face.

Our founder Andrew Carnegie realized that education and moral dialogue were critical toward achieving a more peaceful planet. Carnegie Council's Global Ethics Network brings those founding principles together by engaging teachers, students, and publics around the world in a conversation on a global ethic.

With its global fellowship, student mentorships, and online social network, the Global Ethics Network sparks the creation of new educational resources, the joint exploration of global issues, and the formation of meaningful and lasting partnerships.

GLOBAL ETHICS FELLOWS

Carnegie Council's Global Ethics Network provides a platform for educational institutions around the world to create and share interactive multimedia resources that explore the ethical dimensions of international affairs.

The Global Ethics Fellows and their home institutions form the heart of the Network. They are developing multimedia production facilities that will allow Network partners to record original content created by students and educators. The Network combines existing Carnegie Council resources with their institutions to ignite new ideas and foster lively debate on such subjects as human rights, conflict resolution, and environmental sustainability.

The Network's educational resources include:

  • Live events featuring original Carnegie Council content;
  • Class exercises, lesson plans, and faculty development;
  • Joint lectures, symposiums, and conferences.

By using these resources, students and educators from across the Network conduct independent research and promote ethical inquiries within their communities. Students from the Middle East can record interviews with experts in New York City, while educators in Southeast Asia can collaborate on online curricula with colleagues in Oregon. Through such collaboration, the Network enables its partners to rethink their moral assumptions.

ETHICS FELLOWS FOR THE FUTURE

Ethics Fellows for the Future are student mentees of Carnegie Council Global Ethics Fellows. The purpose of the program is to build the next generation of thinking on ethical issues in international affairs and to facilitate cooperation and dialogue between students from different regions of the world. Mentors will help Fellows for the Future develop collaborative research projects, joint papers, and multimedia by coordinating virtual and in-person collaboration with other students and Fellows.

The duration of this unpaid, non-resident mentorship is one year. In order to qualify for this affiliation, you must be selected by a Global Ethics Fellow.

To find out more, please email Devin T. Stewart.

MORE WAYS TO  GET INVOLVED

Download: Global Ethics Network Brochure (PDF, 721.90 K)

Carnegie Council

Global Ethics Weekly: Human Rights on the Ground, with Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox

Quinnipiac's Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox discusses her work researching the conception of human rights in a community in rural India. She tells the story of Chaya Kakade, a woman who went on a hunger strike after the Indian government proposed a tax on sanitary napkins, and has since built her own production center in Latur. How does Kakade understand human rights? How can Westerners move beyond a legalistic view of the concept?

The Future is Asian, with Parag Khanna

"The rise of China is not the biggest story in the world," says Parag Khanna. "The Asianization of Asia, the return of Asia, the rise of the Asian system, is the biggest story in the world." This new Asian system, where business, technology, globalization, and geopolitics are intertwined, stretches from Japan to Saudi Arabia, from Australia to Russia, and Indonesia to Turkey, linking 5 billion people.

China's Cognitive Warfare, with Rachael Burton

How is China influencing democracies such as Taiwan, Korea, and the United States? "I think there are three areas that you can look at," says Asia security analyst Rachael Burton. "The first is narrative dominance, which I would call a form of cognitive warfare. Beijing has been able to set the terms of debate . . . and once you're asking the questions, then you're able to drive intellectuals or policymakers to a certain answer."

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