Peace requires positive combativity in our relations and equally in the face of our own impulses. But to define peace as the struggle won by reason against instincts is false. It is not by fighting that inner peace is attained, but by cultivating an inner state of appeasement. In contrast to a combat, it is a relationship to be built; With oneself, then with others, where reason is not enough, it is necessary also the heart.
Peace is a perpetual weaving of warm relations of good neighborliness based on the human values ​​and the creativity of each other to overcome the difficulties, the clashes and its own frustrations.
Peace is a relationship of well-being together, solid and lasting, based on respect, serenity, cordiality and good understanding between humans. It is founded as much on the expression of the heart as on reason. It is through human warmth that violence can be transcended.
Peace is a life choice in which human interactions are based on the impulses of humanity capable of reversing the tendencies to the violence of the powerful, the vindictive and the angry, touching their heart and reason. A choice of life at the same time individual, collective, economic and political.
If violence seems omnipresent, then the fields of peace are ubiquitous too. It is up to us to cultivate them.

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How can a nation establish a state of "internal peace" when its government is being organized and run by political parties which are biased toward the interests of relatively small numbers of their people? Usually the ruling party in current democratic systems contains several fractions and only some of them favor the policy being actually taken. If the majorities are small and only 2 sides are representative, then the maximum numbers who are effectively in control are only a quarter of the whole. (2 main parties having 2 main fractions.) Thus a more ideal state of democracy is not necessarily possible and often a minority can gain formal and legal control.

There is also a tendency for the minorities to get more than fair representation, however this may be opposed by the use of wards or regions where the elected member is not always in the party that gets the most total number of votes. Then the call for cultivated peace through a democratic process seems to be to be an impossible achievement.

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