All Discussions Tagged 'peace' (4)

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Why can't we just get along?

Is it too much to ask for? That we be at peace with each other and just thrive to develop our planet and everything else far beyond. Please…

Started by Precious Ropafadzo Chiduku

4 Feb 21, 2015
Reply by Precious Ropafadzo Chiduku

Existential harmony

The Earth planet is an important part of the whole cosmos. It is essentially governed by the Laws of Nature and it functions in a harmoniou…

Started by Professor (Dr) Surendra Pathak

3 Mar 6, 2014
Reply by Al LeBlanc

Syria: Two Positions to Consider

As the drumbeat for war in Syria intensifies, Carnegie Council publishes two pieces on the ethics of intervention: AGAINST: "'To Jaw-Jaw Is…

Started by Carnegie Council

5 Sep 10, 2013
Reply by Linda Eggert

The Letter of Last Resort: A Debate on Second Strike Nuclear Ethics

BBC hosted the following discussion: What would you tell the commander of the Trident submarine at sea to do if the UK was destroyed, and i…

Started by Carnegie Council

1 Aug 5, 2013
Reply by Al LeBlanc

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The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder, with Sean McFate

"Nobody fights conventionally except for us anymore, yet we're sinking a big bulk, perhaps the majority of our defense dollars, into preparing for another conventional war, which is the very definition of insanity," declares national security strategist and former paratrooper Sean McFate. The U.S. needs to recognize that we're living in an age of "durable disorder"--a time of persistent, smoldering conflicts--and the old rules no longer apply.

The Crack-Up: 1919 & the Birth of Modern Korea, with Kyung Moon Hwang

Could the shared historical memory of March 1 ever be a source of unity between North Koreans and South Koreans? In this fascinating episode of The Crack-Up series that explores how 1919 shaped the modern world, Professor Kyung Moon Hwang discusses the complex birth of Korean nationhood and explains how both North and South Korea owe their origins and their national history narratives to the events swirling around March 1, 1919.

The Sicilian Expedition and the Dilemma of Interventionism

The Peloponnesian War has lessons for U.S. foreign policy beyond the Thucydides Trap. Johanna Hanink reminds us that the debate over moral exceptionalism and interventionism is nothing new.

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