Winners of the 2013 International Student Photo Contest, Living with Differences

Carnegie Council is delighted to announce the winners of its first international student photo contest, Living with Differences. There was a wide range of interpretation on the concept of "difference." Nationality, race, gender, disability, age, and wealth were the most common motifs.

FIRST PRIZE

For first prize, the judges chose a colorful image of intercultural connection—a British teacher, learning with her Indian students, as captured by a Japanese photographer. The winner is Saori Ibuki, a student at International Christian University (JAPAN). Here's how she describes her photo, "Namaste," featured above.

This was the last day for Liz, who volunteered for eight weeks as a teacher at Aim Abroad's slum school in Faridabad, India. She taught English, Math and probably everything except Hindi (which the kids taught her). I was there as a volunteer photographer to document their time together.
So, the kids were from Faridabad, Liz was from England, and I was from Japan. We all came from different parts of the world; spoke different languages; and had different skin color. But there we were, together in our little sanctuary, and who in the world could've told us we were "different" from each other?

 

We received more than 130 entries from almost 30 different countries: Australia, Bangladesh, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Egypt, Germany, Greece, Haiti, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Poland, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, United States, Uganda, and Vietnam.

Thank you to everyone who took part! We look forward to next year!

—CARNEGIE COUNCIL


SECOND PRIZES

"Our reality"
Katlego Maqubela
SOUTH AFRICA
Inscape Design College

 

"Living with Differences"
Turjoy Chowdhury
BANGLADESH
Brac University

 


RUNNERS UP

"Living with Differences"
Matt Ripley
UNITED KINGDOM
University of Southern California

 

"Hiking, the universal form of leisure"
Thidathorn Vanitsthian
THAILAND
University of California, Irvine

 

"Pound It!"
Michael Folta
UNITED STATES
home school

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Tags: #photo2013

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