The Oslo Forum Peacewriter Prize - Essay Competition

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The Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue (HD) is launching the Oslo Forum Peacewriter Prize, an essay competition seeking bold and innovative responses to today’s peacemaking challenges. Submissions should take the form of an analytical essay relevant to the practice of conflict mediation.

The opportunity:

  • Stake your credentials as an innovative thinker in the field by presenting your strategies, approaches or solutions to challenges in the practice of conflict mediation.
  • unique chance for your cutting-edge thinking to be discussed by leading conflict mediators at the 2017 Oslo Forum (http://www.osloforum.org).
  • Influence a wider audience via online publication after the event.
  • 1,000 Swiss Francs in prize money for the winning essay.

Entries should be sent to osloforum@hdcentre.org  by midnight (Central European Time) on 12 March 2017.

For more information click here.

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