Just Out: "Ethics & International Affairs" Spring 2018 Issue

We are pleased to present a Special Issue of Ethics & International Affairs!

THE ENTIRE ISSUE IS FREE FOR A LIMITED TIME.

The heart of this Special Issue is a roundtable on the theme of "Rising Powers and the International Order," with contributions from G. John Ikenberry, Shiping Tang, Anne L. Clunan, Deepa M. Ollapally, Ole Wæver, and Andrew Hurrell. Each essay in the collection examines the future of the global order from the perspective of one or more major rising powers, as well as the EU and the United States. The issue also contains an essay on golden visas and the marketization of citizenship by Ayelet Shachar; a review essay on eliminating corruption by Gillian Brock; and book reviews from Kevin Macnish, Colleen Murphy, Brigit Toebes, and Steven Vanderheiden.


ESSAY
The Marketization of Citizenship in an Age of Restrictionism
Ayelet Shachar
This essay traces the rise of golden visa programs and critically evaluates the legal, normative, and distributional quandaries they raise. Shachar writes that the intrusion of market logic into the sovereign act of defining "who belongs" raises significant justice and equality concerns that require closer scrutiny.


ROUNDTABLE: RISING POWERS AND THE INTERNATIONAL ORDER

Introduction
G. John Ikenberry and Shiping Tang, Guest Editors

One of the great dramas of world politics across the centuries has been the rise and decline of leading states. This roundtable brings together distinguished international scholars to reflect on this grand power transition, focusing on the ways that rising states may be shaping and reshaping global order.

Why the Liberal World Order Will Survive
G. John Ikenberry

This essay offers an evolutionary perspective of international order and argues that although America's hegemonic position may be declining, the liberal international characteristics of order—openness, rules, and multilateralism—are deeply rooted and likely to persist.

China and the Future International Order(s)
Shiping Tang

In this essay, Shiping Tang surveys the key discourse in China on international order, arguing that China sees no need for, and hence does not seek, fundamental transformation but rather piecemeal modification of the existing order.

Russia and the Liberal World Order
Anne L. Clunan

Anne L. Clunan writes that the question of Russia's desire to change a liberal international order hangs on the type of liberalism embedded in that order. Moreover, despite some calls from within to create a new, post-liberal order premised on conservative nationalism and geopolitics, Russia is unlikely to fare well in such a world.

India and the International Order: Accommodation and Adjustment
Deepa M. Ollapally

In this essay, Deepa M. Ollapally argues that India's deep-seated anti-colonial nationalism and commitment to strategic autonomy continue to form the core of Indian identity. This, in turn, informs India's partial and instrumental commitment to Western-dominated multilateral institutions and Western norms.

A Post-Western Europe: Strange Identities in a Less Liberal World O...
Ole Wæver

Ole Wæver writes that Europe's curious position—neither declining hegemon nor rising power—brings to light some intriguing dynamics of the international order. This essay traces the threats and opportunities to Europe presented by the emerging order in four domains: overall power, economics, values, and institutions.

Beyond the BRICS: Power, Pluralism, and the Future of Global Order
Andrew Hurrell

In this essay, Andrew Hurrell takes a broad look at rising powers as a collective. Dramatic changes in the global system have led many to conclude that the focus on the BRICS reflected a particular moment in time that has now passed. The story line is now about backlash at the core. But this conclusion is profoundly mistaken, and rising powers are as relevant as ever.


REVIEW ESSAY
How Should We Combat Corruption? Lessons from Theory and Practice
Gillian Brock

In this review essay, Gillian Brock surveys four recent books on corruption, all of which offer important insights. If the books share one weakness, it is that they do not sufficiently emphasize the importance of getting people to believe and feel that they have fair opportunities for good lives, even after institutional and legal reforms are made.


REVIEWS
Ethics in an Age of Surveillance: Personal Information and Virtual Identities
Adam Henschke
Review by Kevin Macnish

This book presents a philosophically sophisticated examination of metadata collection and the ethical issues that it raises. The field of surveillance has tended until now to be explored only at the applied level, but with this work Henschke pushes the debate back to ontological basics, asking what are data, how do we form perceptions, and what is information?

Selling the Future: The Perils of Predicting Global Politics
Ariel Colonomos, trans. Gregory Elliott
Review by Colleen Murphy

In this book, Ariel Colonomos discusses the details of how the future is forecast in three major domains—academia, think tanks, and credit agencies—and emphasizes the limitations of current practices in each. In doing so, he makes a convincing case for treating the future as a topic of interest in its own right and as subject to certain normative constraints.

The Global Health Crisis: Ethical Responsibilities
Thana Cristina de Campos
Review by Brigit Toebes

In this book, Thana Cristina de Campos focuses on identifying the moral responsibilities of nonstate actors, particularly the pharmaceutical industry, in the field of global health. In developing ethical and philosophical perspectives of the global health crisis, the book makes a welcome contribution to the discussion.

Environmental Success Stories: Solving Major Ecological Problems & Confronting Climate Change
Frank M. Dunnivant
Review by Steven Vanderheiden

Global environmental challenges such as climate change are sometimes viewed as so daunting and complex that we can only aim to mitigate rather than solve the problems they cause. In this book, Frank M. Dunnivant responds with a series of "success stories" designed to instruct on the role of environmental science in policymaking.


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Making Foreign Policy Relevant Again, with Asha Castleberry & Ali Wyne

Has a gap opened up between the U.S. national security community and the general public over foreign policy? If so, why? How can we close it? This panel with foreign policy experts Asha Castleberry and Ali Wyne is part of a larger effort by Carnegie Council's U.S. Global Engagement Program to examine drivers in U.S. politics pushing the United States to disengage from international affairs.

The Ethics of the "Doorstep"

The "doorstep test" requires policymakers to be able to articulate how, and to what degree, something happening in the world connects to the day-to-day experience, needs, and interests of the citizenry. This construct requires honesty and reminds us that domestic policy and foreign policy ought to be linked.

Malaysian & Indonesian Elections, with Meredith Weiss & Jeremy Menchik

This fascinating conversation begins with a discussion of the critical importance of Southeast Asia, including the rise of China and its ambitions in the region. Then Professor Weiss focuses on Malaysia and the return of the formidable 93-year old Mahathir as prime minister. Next, Professor Menchik discusses the complex situation in Indonesia--a country with 17,000 islands and 300-plus ethnic groups--and the upcoming elections there.

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