Social Networks Editor

Waging Nonviolence, a non-profit online news source about movements for justice and peace around the world, seeks a part-time Social Networks Editor. With an eye toward the growing role of online social media in popular movements, the Social Networks Editor will be responsible for:

  • using a diverse array of online (and offline) tools to disseminate WNV content;
  • monitoring breaking stories on various networks;
  • managing and growing WNV‘s membership program;
  • blogging regularly about topics related to activist social networks.

Candidates should have demonstrated experience in successfully organizing through activist social media networks and be familiar with a broad range of activist networks on a variety of issues, both in the United States and abroad. They should be based in or near New York City and available for weekly staff meetings in Brooklyn, as well as occasional evening events. Ability to work remotely and independently is a must, setting and meeting goals without oversight. This position is part-time, with flexible hours and modest pay, while providing the chance to be part of a small, dynamic, and growing organization committed to journalistic excellence and social change.

Applicants should send the following to contact@wagingnonviolence.org:

  • A few paragraphs explaining why you are right for the job
  • A map (visual or narrative) of your relevant social networks, online and off, including personal and organizational accounts you manage
  • A resume including past work and organizing experience

Applications will be read for form as well as content.

Videographer

Do you make videos that inspire people to action? Are you looking for ways to use your skills to foster social change?

Waging Nonviolence, a website of daily news and analysis about resistance movements around the world, is looking for a NY-based filmmaker to shoot and edit a series of very short videos showcasing innovative activist strategies and tactics. We can pay about $100 per video. If you’re interested, write to contact@wagingnonviolence.org. Include something about your background and interests, and include links to your previous work.

Internship

Waging Nonviolence is accepting applications for interns on a rolling basis to assist with tasks such as:

  • Developing story ideas and populating the Experiments With Truth feature;
  • Using social media to help promote our content;
  • Event planning and support;
  • Fundraising and membership development.

Interns should be able to attend regular meetings in New York City and have a demonstrated interest in journalism, international affairs and nonviolent struggle. To apply please send a resume and cover letter to contact@wagingnonviolence.org.

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Tags: communication, job, nonviolence, peace

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