With so many competing claims in our connected world, what's the right thing to do?

To find out, Carnegie Council invited world-changing visionaries and role models from diverse professions, backgrounds, and regions to identify the greatest ethical questions facing the planet and to offer creative advice on how humanity should respond.

The result is Thought Leaders Forum, a multimedia site featuring insights from 55 leading minds. Browse through interviews with inspiring people such as former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Louise Arbour; former President of Ireland Mary Robinson; former U.S. National Security Advisor Brent Scowcroft; political theorist Michael Walzer; and sociobiologist E. O. Wilson.

Access it free of charge here: http://www.carnegiecouncil.org/thoughtleaders

In the tradition of Andrew Carnegie, who founded Carnegie Council 100 years ago, we asked Thought Leaders questions related to world peace and ethical leadership. Please watch the videos and let us know what you think:

The Carnegie Council team spent several months poring over the interview transcripts and designing a website with an eye toward making these complex topics as accessible as possible. The background images are photographs that depict themes of civic participation, leadership, as well as natural and cultural heritage.

“By taking the occasion of our centennial to ask leading thinkers from around the world these big—almost unreasonable—questions, we aimed to accomplish several things,” said project director Devin Stewart. “First, we wanted to illuminate the current thinking on topics that are core to our mission, namely ethics, peace, and education. Second, by including questions of an aspirational nature, we hoped to help organizations with agenda-setting. Finally, the Thought Leaders site serves as an educational resource to spark debates in classrooms worldwide.”

Stewart will synthesize the interviews into a report and syllabus later this year.

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Tags: TLF, accountability, education, ethics, future, leadership, peace

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Comment by Al LeBlanc on October 15, 2016 at 2:58pm

Thought "Thought Leaders Forum" had outstanding World Leaders /Scholars to "....serves as an educational resource to spark debates in classroom worldwide."  Seems to me want these leaders to inspire/motivate/"grass root" social media users to use their personal cyber power to advocate for world peace and planet survival - not just "classrooms worldwide". Need to provide many social media links to enable CyberPeaceAdvocates,  like myself, to "spread the word" on these "educational topics (more so than just Twitter and Facebook).  Disappointed this GEN feature dormant. Carnegie should encourage cyberpeacefare individual grassroots "cyber force multipliers"  Also need to facilitate interlinking of various Carnegie site on common dashboard on all sites.  CyberPeaceGadfly

Comment by Nduhura Julius on October 13, 2016 at 3:49am

Am mostly anxious about how the question,'is world peace possible? how it will be answered.great forum indeed.

Comment by Al LeBlanc on March 1, 2014 at 12:12pm

Great Forum ! Choice of topics by well chosen and respected national/international leaders.

What think U idea of Interfaith Interoperability Dialogue Forum of World Religious Leaders/Scholars: Judaism-Christianity-Islam - common heritage and cardinal tenets ( One God, Golden Rule, 10 Commandments, etc, stressing what "unites vs what "divides") ?

Al

 

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