From Indiana University ROTC - #GlobalEthicsDay2017

Indiana University Army ROTC took part in this year's Global Ethics Day by discussing human rights. More specifically, discoursing how human rights are the foundation for any discussion on international or global ethics because human rights constitute the core of international justice. Human rights not only stipulate how states must interact externally with other states but also stipulate how a state must internally treat its own people. These rights place a limit on a state’s internal and external autonomy. 

For more, visit Indiana University's Army ROTC Homepage

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Tags: #globalethicsday2017, indiana, rotc


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