Chase Allan Look

Lansing Community College

Undergraduate Student

Ethics of Nuclear War

 

The greatest ethical challenge I see facing the world is nuclear war. Tensions have been rising between several countries for many years now, and it’s just a matter of time before a nuclear strike happens. Ever since the United States dropped a nuke on Hiroshima, Japan during World War Two, every country has been trying to be the first to do it again. The hunger for power has deluded that conscious of mankind to the point that we are doing more harm than good. I want to use the North Korean missile tests as an example because it’s leader Kim Jong-Un, is making all kinds of threats to the United States about the US Territory of Guam and is saying his missiles will land about twenty miles from the shore of Guam. Most recently, they fired missiles over Japan and it cause the entire country to go on alert. The entire country was told to shelter in place. This was after North Korea made threats to Japan about how the missiles would destroy the country. Japan wouldn’t be able to defend because their military is not suitable for a crisis like this. I have noticed that threats of a nuclear war has been implied by the leaders of multiple countries. I, like everyone else, don’t want this to happen as a lot of the world’s population will feel the effects of it. Just like the Council, I want a world where we shouldn’t be afraid of a missile or something else attacking us and destroying everything we know and love.

I would like to see things go smooth without violence in the picture. Violence is never the answer and we shouldn’t be scared of a country who can help us with our trading as an example. Now, I’m not one that likes to talk about stuff like this but I live in this world where unfortunately, I have to deal with it along with everyone else. We has humans have evolved and we are in the day in age where technology is basically the main thing right now and is taking over our lives. I’m sure that 20 years ago we didn’t have to worry about this, but this isn’t the 1990s. This is 2017 and we are even more dangerous than we were before. I sometimes lay in bed at night and wonder what this world would be like without fear of weapons in the sky. I ask myself the questions, “Why do we have this? Why is this still a problem? Why are there so many people who will suffer if this happens?” Innocent lives are in danger and no one even cares. Why do people have to die just because people are angry at each other? That shouldn’t even be a question. I don’t have a proper answer to these questions but I’m sure that someone out there does.

What I think should happen is that the missiles should only be used in a way that won’t harm anyone. What I was taught is if you’re angry with someone, sit down and talk about it. That’s exactly what should happen with leaders of countries so that innocent lives aren’t put in jeopardy. I remember a time in middle school when a guest speaker came and talked to us. He was saying how the lives we have now are much better than back in the 20th century because they were afraid of problems like this. Of course in that time, they didn’t have nuclear weapons as much as they did but they had planes which did a lot more damage at the time than a nuclear warhead. He also said “Make great decisions and your life will be much better.” Everyone in the school took that into consideration and once he left, our school got much better in terms of behavior and respect. After that experience, I realized that life really is short and I will take all the time I can to do what I want and what I have to do at the same time. I think we should come up with solutions to a problem without the need of weapons and innocent lives being lost. Here’s what I think, with today’s age of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other types of social media out there. It’s easier to communicate then it was 10 years ago. Everyone these days has a communication device of some kind. It could be a phone, laptop, tablet, whatever. With all these means of communication, we can talk about stuff without seeing each other in person. It’s these way of communication that I feel like these problems can be solved. I know it’s easier to talk about things face to face but now it’s just not the case with all the technology in the world today. If I was in a situation like that, I would be the one who would help try to resolve the problem then provoke it to an even bigger problem that I couldn’t handle. I would explain the situation then talk about the consequences that comes with the problem. I know the person wouldn’t listen to me, but at least they would be able to help keep lives of my people and their people safe and secure. If a country was to fire a nuclear missile on us, it would be bad especially with Hurricanes Harvey and Irma completely slamming Texas and Florida. Those states are already having problems of their own and if a warhead hit us, that would cause even more problems that they don’t need after the hurricanes. The thing is, the states on both coasts would be hit first because they are easier to hit and also it could do a lot more damage to other states around it compared to hitting the center of the country. A smaller country like Japan or China would be a total loss because of the isolated populations in both countries. I feel like that with the way things have been going with the weather and wildfires, another war is exactly what we don’t need.

 

Nukes are the main thing that everyone wants to use now. The only people who know how they work are the people within the military all over the world. I know that there are nukes underground all over the world and they have specific paths they take. No matter where you live they will be a threat to you. A solution I want to see happen is that leaders of two countries or more will have a discussion and try to keep things calm without bringing up the warheads or other similar problem. If I was the leader of a country, I would chat with my rival. We are all the same on the inside even though we are from different countries or ethnicities. We are all human and we all live on the same planet together. Together, we can all work together to get along and we should never be afraid of a nuke dropping on our heads. Thank you for listening and we can do this together, all of us.

 

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Comment by Al LeBlanc on October 9, 2017 at 10:53am

Thanks for creating and sharing !  Yes, ".......we can do this together, all of us."

Comment by Edozie John Paul Uzoma on September 30, 2017 at 10:19am
Nice write up brother
Comment by Edozie John Paul Uzoma on September 30, 2017 at 10:18am
Nice write up brother
Comment by Edozie John Paul Uzoma on September 30, 2017 at 10:18am
Nice write up brother
Comment by Edozie John Paul Uzoma on September 30, 2017 at 10:17am
Nice write up brother
Comment by Edozie John Paul Uzoma on September 30, 2017 at 10:17am
Nice write up brother

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