Essential Guidelines for Writing a Cover Letter for a Volunteer Position

Gaining enough experience in a certain field can take a lot of time, especially for those who are new to a certain occupation or fresh from college including getting a volunteer position or writing jobs. But, there is a way to turn things around and earn you experience and build your resume; volunteering. This is the act of dedicating your time and services to a person or organization without expecting any monetary reward. It is a good way to get some experience before venturing into searching for your dream career.

So, how do you write a killer cover letter get a volunteer position? Here are five ideas that will be helpful.

  • Look through for open volunteer opportunities

Search for open volunteer jobs with entities where you would be interested in working for and having all the position details before writing your letter. They can be social work, a job for writers, and so on. There are many websites where you can search for volunteering jobs including Idealist, Volunteer Match, and so on.

Identify multiple positions to find one that fits you best. Then get to know what the position you’re interested in requires you to do.

  • Conduct a background research of the company

Once you have found your favorite volunteer position, go back and research the company or organization offering the position. Sometimes, it is common to find that you have the right qualification for a certain position, but you find that the company values are different from what you want. So, before applying for the position, make sure you have reviewed all the detail and you’re happy working in that position. This information can be found in the organization's mission statement and values.

Perhaps you’ve recently volunteered for a company or you intend to do so. These tips will help you know what to include in your cover letter to sound relevant and land the opportunity. Don’t forget to do your research on the position first before sending an application letter.

 

Betsy Randall is a custom paper writer at Termpapereasy.com, part-time editor at WritingJobz, and volunteer blogger at WeHireHeroes. Her extra passion is Eastern Philosophy and she provides free tutoring at local high school.

Views: 121

Comment

You need to be a member of Global Ethics Network to add comments!

Join Global Ethics Network

Carnegie Council

The Jungle Grows Back: America and Our Imperiled World, with Robert Kagan

"The analogy that is at the heart of this book is about a jungle and a garden," says Robert Kagan. "In order to have a garden and sustain a garden, you've got to be constantly gardening. For me at least, that is a good analogy for this liberal world order, which itself is an unnatural creation which natural forces are always working to undermine." Human nature has not fundamentally changed, and this peaceful period is an aberration.

The Living Legacy of the First World War

Five Fellows from "The Living Legacy of the First World War" project present their work. Their talks cover the history of war-induced psychological trauma and how it has been dealt with in the U.S. military; the impact of the defense industry's profit motive on U.S. foreign policy; haunting photos of severely facially disfigured soldiers; the legacy of press censorship during WWI; and the humanitarianism of Jane Addams.

Myanmar and the Plight of the Rohingya, with Elliott Prasse-Freeman

The Rohingya are seen as fundamentally 'other,' says Prasse-Freeman. "Hence, even if they have formal citizenship, they wouldn't really be accepted as citizens, as full members of the polity." Could Aung San Suu Kyi have done more to prevent the persecution? How important was the hate speech on Facebook? How can the situation be resolved? Don't miss this informative and troubling conversation.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

VIDEOS

SUPPORT US

GEO-GOVERNANCE MATTERS

© 2018   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service


The views and opinions expressed in the media, comments, or publications on this website are those of the speakers or authors and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Carnegie Council.