Mechanical analogy to macroeconomics system

The 6 idealized entities, Landlord, Household, Producer, Capitalist, Government and Finance-Institution, are representative of all of the role-playing parts of the macroeconomics system of a country. As horizontal beams at the top of the model, they balance the aggregated (general) flows of money versus goods, services, valuable documents, etc. which are represented by the tensions in the strings, due to the weights in each of the 19 carriers at the bottom. This model is the most simple possible when one properly includes the effects of the 3 Smithian factors of production, Land, Labor and Capital as well as their 3 returns, ground rent, wages and interest. No other modeler has ever managed this full and proper representation, which is unique.

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