Global Ethics Day 2017 - Combatting Human Trafficking

According to the United Nations' Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, human trafficking is:

 “...the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, or fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation.”

These crimes of modern day slavery affect millions of men, women, and children around the globe, every minute of every day. Victims, who are statistically more likely to be women and girls, are bought and sold as property. They are often taken for sexual exploitation, but also can fall victim to forced labour and face other atrocities that violate their basic human rights.

In 2016, the government identified 3,800 victims of human trafficking in the United Kingdom alone, but that number is likely much higher. According to Will Kerr of the National Crime Agency, a more accurate representation of these unidentified victims in the UK stands in the tens of thousands. In Britain alone, there have been reported cases as far reaching as an organized gang profiting £4.5 million from sexual exploitation, or as small as a twelve year old girl being sold into servitude as a domestic slave in a family home.

For Global Ethics Day 2017, University of Leicester's Amnesty International Club will be hosting a representative from the organisation Stop the Traffik, who will be giving a talk on how ordinary people can fight against trafficking, followed by a question and answer session about the NGO. 

Read more here.

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Tags: #ethics, #globalethicsday2017, human, trafficking

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