Desertification and its impact on the international economy

Desertification is exposure is known as the land degradation in arid, semi-arid and dry sub-humid areas, leading to the loss of plant life and biodiversity by this leads to loss of the ability of the land to agricultural production and support animal and human life.
It has multiple causes of this phenomenon, including the natural and human resources, while, such as the decrease of rain amounts in the years shown publicly drought also poverty vegetation cover, which reduces evaporation, thus reducing rainfall, in addition to offering the soil to deviate and reduces their fertility on the other hand lead to population pressure on the environment is the natural territory of the margins shoots to agricultural land, and transformed into housing and industrial installations, in addition to the mining operations are not subject to appropriate For controls
with the environment.
As the manifestations of the desertification phenomenon affecting the human life of its various activities and comes in the forefront of agricultural activity, directly or indirectly, so as to become a part of the challenges facing most countries in the world, this phenomenon has become a major problem because of its relationship to the lives of the population through their direct impact on the components of the elements of the environment in which the population lived in two important aspects: the first aspect is the fact that they have an impact on the food source of the population, while the second side in the emergence of the impact on the atmosphere.
In the first aspect emerged phenomenon through the transformation of large areas of the most fertile agricultural land, tools and economic output good diet to non-arable lands first low productivity secondly, negative has continued at all levels of environmental and economic through increased demand for food and its sources to pollution as well as the urban expansion on my agricultural land.
Therefore, desertification is one of the basic constraints that impede economic and social development in all parts of the world

Views: 163

Comment

You need to be a member of Global Ethics Network to add comments!

Join Global Ethics Network

Carnegie Council

The Living Legacy of WWI: Jane Addams & Her Cosmopolitan Ethics, with Seiko Mimaki

"What distinguished Addams from other peace advocates was her strong emphasis on the crucial role of marginalized people, such as women, immigrants, and workers, in the peacemaking process," says Seiko Mimaki. Her views are highly relevant today, when people see themselves as abandoned by global elites. Unlike that of Woodrow Wilson, her vision of cosmopolitanism "pursued freedom and opportunity for everyone, not just for a privileged few."

What do Americans (Republican Voters) Actually Think?

We hear all sorts of assumptions as to what American voters—and now specifically Republican voters who may or may not serve as the basis for President Trump's support—think and believe about U.S. foreign policy. Do they have affection for Putin and Russia? Are they skeptical of free trade?

The People vs. Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger and How to Save It, with Yasch Mounk

Harvard's Yascha Mounk argues that liberalism and democracy are coming apart, creating new forms of illiberal democracy (democracy without rights) and undemocratic liberalism (rights without democracy). Populist leaders are flourishing; indeed, Hungary is on the verge of descending into dictatorship, with shamefully little criticism from the Europe or the U.S. What are the causes of this phenomenon? What can we do about it?

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

E&IA Journal

GEO-GOVERNANCE MATTERS

© 2018   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service