#Cyberpeacefare #Peace #Eleanor Roosevelt

"It isn't enough to talk about peace.  One must believe in it. And it isn't enough to believe in it. One must work at it."  Eleanor Roosevelt

Christmas is the season of celebrating the birth of the Prince of Peace in a manger in Bethlehem.  It is also the commercialization of Santa Claus. Why not take a moment to digitize your personal cyber peace sentiments  as a free gift to the world this Christmas Season ? ("The best things in life are free").  You might compose your own message of peace on your social media platform(s) or quote the lyrics of the classic Christmas song:

        "Let there be peace on earth and let it begin with me"

Check out #Cyberpeacefare.  Become a CyberPeaceCitizen.  Help Initiate a CyberWorldPeaceTsunami ("butterfly effect") this Christmas Season. The power is in your thoughts for peace and immediately in your digits. 

CyberPeaceGadfly

 CyberPeaceGadfly

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Tags: #Christmas, #Cyberpeacefare, #Free, 2017, Cyber, Gift, Peace, World

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