Carnegie Council Appoints Nine Fellows for the Project, "The Living Legacy of the First World War"

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is pleased to announce the selection of nine fellows who will receive stipends and other support to pursue research under the project "The Living Legacy of the First World War." The project is supported by a grant from the Richard Lounsbery Foundation. The selected fellows will pursue original research and writing for publication. They will conduct podcasted interviews and attend a conference at a location to be determined.

The centennial of a historic event is an occasion for reflection and perhaps for reconsideration. With the centennial, an event has definitely receded past the horizon of living memory, entering the pages of history, leaving behind its share of artifacts and other tangible reminders. It is a time to ask how much of the spirit of a departed age we can capture, how much can this time be entered into given the tools that we have, and what importance the memory of this departed time can have for us, now.

So it is with the American experience of World War I. America entered World War I with considerable reluctance. The fighting had gone on for nearly three years before America declared war, and it would be another year before American forces would see major combat. Active American involvement was brief but violent. Afterwards, America seemed to retreat again into itself. In many ways, we are still living today with the conflict and its aftermath. The diverse, in many cases long-lasting consequences of World War I are reflected in the range of topics being pursued by the scholars selected for Fellowships.

The Fellows and Their Topics

  • Katherine Akey, Collective Memory and the Hidden Photographic Narratives of World War I

  • Mary Barton, European and American Counterterrorism Strategies in the Aftermath of WWI

  • Christopher Capozzola, Merchants of Death? The Politics of Defense Contracting, Then and Now

  • Philip Caruso, Airpower during World War I: Transforming International Law

  • Zach Dorfman, Chemical Weapons from the Great War to Syria and Beyond

  • Tanisha Fazal, The Politics and Medicine of Treating Post-Traumatic Stress Since World War I

  • Richard Millett, The United States, the Western Hemisphere, and World War I: Forgotten Aspects

  • Seiko Mimaki, World War I as a Key Moment in the History of Humanitarianism: Jane Addams and Her Cosmopolitan Ethics

  • Charles Sorrie, The Legacy of American Press Censorship During the First World War

ABOUT THE RICHARD LOUNSBERY FOUNDATION
The Richard Lounsbery Foundation aims to enhance national strengths in science and technology through support of a variety of programs in research, education, and public policy. Among its international initiatives, the Foundation has a long-standing priority in Franco-American relations, as Richard Lounsbery was a U.S. Army officer who served in France during World War I. For more, go to www.rlounsbery.org.

ABOUT CARNEGIE COUNCIL
Founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1914, Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is an educational, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that produces lectures, publications, and multimedia materials on the ethical challenges of living in a globalized world.

Photo L to R from top row: Katherine Akey, Mary Barton, Christopher Capozzola, Philip Caruso, Zach Dorfman, Tanisha Fazal, Richard Millett, Seiko Mimaki, Charles Sorrie

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