Carnegie Council and the New Administration

Carnegie Council and the New Administration

At Carnegie Council, we believe ethics matter. For those of us who also believe that ethical principles are the foundation of our democratic society, this is a challenging moment. The new American president lives by his own code of conduct, proudly disrupting traditional expectations and constraints. For now, U.S. voters have rewarded him for brash irreverence and the promise of change. 

As an organization focused on educating the public on ethical choices, we are concerned that this period of leadership not have a corrosive effect on American politics and culture, or on the politics and culture of other nations. We believe it is our role as Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs to keep standards high and to resist a slide toward incivility. We trust that schools, churches, businesses, and responsible media outlets will do so too.

Other organizations will no doubt focus on analyses of leadership style, rhetoric, and political conflict. At Carnegie Council, we will focus on the ethical principles at stake in the actual policies of the new administration—specifically its foreign policy. This is where our Council's educational programs can contribute most significantly to public knowledge and understanding. 

Read the full press release here.

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