Carnegie Climate Geoengineering Governance Initiative (C2G2) Launches New Website

Carnegie Council announces the launch of a new website for its Carnegie Climate Geoengineering Governance Initiative, known as C2G2. Go to c2g2.net.

The world faces the rising possibility of catastrophic temperature rise due to climate change. This could cause a massive increase in suffering, especially amongst the poor and most vulnerable. Because of this threat, a growing number of scientists and academics are considering the use of geoengineering technologies, both as a way of reducing the causes of climate change (greenhouse gases) and its symptoms (high temperatures). Geoengineering is defined as the proposed, large-scale intentional human intervention in the earth’s climate system to reduce the negative effects of climate change.

However, geoengineering technologies present a complex mix of risks, costs, and benefits, and may have different effects on different communities. If geoengineering is to be deployed in a way that minimizes risk, maximizes benefit, and is done so ethically for all people, it will need to be governed.

"C2G2 is not for or against the research, testing or potential use of climate geoengineering technologies. That is a choice for society to make," says C2G2 Executive Director Janos Pasztor. "The initiative was created to kickstart a global conversation about what that governance might look like. What technologies exactly need to be governed, and how? Who needs to be involved in taking these decisions? What rules and regulations are needed, both to limit the potential ill effects of geoengineering, and to increase the possibility that it will reduce suffering?"

C2G2's work is grounded in a rigorous and deliberate examination of the best data and information available. The initiative seeks balance, but not at the cost of accuracy.  The website is not, and does not aspire to be, the ultimate authority on geoengineering or its governance. While C2G2 will do its best to represent a multiplicity of views, consensus on this contentious topic will be difficult to achieve. Hopefully there is one issue everyone will agree on: if ever geoengineering technologies are to be applied, they will need to be governed.

Website Layout

About C2G2: An overview of C2G2 and its aims.  

Governing Geoengineering: A basic introduction to the topic, particularly for those new to the debate.

Resources and Tools: A repository of more in-depth information, including, over time, papers, infographics, and other materials which professionals can use in their own work and presentations.

News and Events: A blog, advisories, recent news articles, and upcoming events important to the governance of geoengineering—both C2G2 events, and those in the wider community.

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Founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1914, Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is an educational, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that produces lectures, publications, and multimedia materials on the ethical challenges of living in a globalized world.  

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