Call for Applications for Manila Fact-Finding Trip, October 2018, DEADLINE MARCH 16!

Carnegie Council's Asia Dialogues program will lead a one-week fact finding trip (site visit) to Manila, Philippines, during the week of October 22, 2018. The purpose of the trip will be to conduct dialogues with experts and practitioners to explore current issues relating to climate change in Philippine politics and society. Topics of conversation may include: rising sea levels, disaster response, human rights, migration, community resilience, urban planning, civil rights, gender equality, energy policy, and climate change mitigation and adaptation.

The trip leverages both a global network of scholars and a method of moral inquiry that Carnegie Council has developed over the past several years. Delegates on this trip will be expected to publish at least one article (less than 2,000 words) based on their experience in the Philippines and educational resources provided by Carnegie Council. The articles, which can be published on the Council's website or elsewhere, will be included in a final Field Guide, which the Council will curate for public education. Other opportunities to present your findings may also occur.

We are now accepting applications from students and professionals under 40 from the United States and East Asia to join this trip as a delegate. Thanks to support from the Henry Luce Foundation, Carnegie Council will cover airfare and hotel expenses of the delegates. Carnegie Council is working with scholars from Philippine universities to facilitate the dialogues between the delegates and experts, activists, and other members of Philippine society.

Eligibility

  • Citizen of the United States or from one of the following in East Asia: Brunei, Cambodia, China (including Hong Kong and Macau), East Timor, Indonesia, Japan, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, North Korea, Philippines, South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, or Vietnam;
  • A student or a professional under 40 years of age;
  • Able to travel to Manila during the week of October 21-27, 2018;
  • Students must identify a professor who can oversee their research project;
  • Have a demonstrated interest in the Philippines, Southeast Asia, and/or climate change
  • English proficiency.

Please send your CV and a letter of interest (1,000 words or less) to Amanda Ghanooni (AGhanooni@cceia.org) by March 16, 2018. Your letter should explain: the topic of your independent research project and how traveling to the Philippines will assist that project; your interest in the Philippines and/or climate change; the professor who will oversee your project if you are a student; how your professional experience will relate to this project if you are a young professional.

Carnegie Council's aim with this project is to foster mutual learning, forge new meaningful relationships across cultural lines, and continue to bring the Council's ethical dialogue to local communities around the world.

Image Credit: Christine Wuthrich, gomanilatravel (CC)

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Comment by Hanane Saouli on February 10, 2018 at 2:18pm

very nice but me my from algeria near i habite in usa

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