Call for Applications: Academic Visitor Programme for Trinity Term 2013 (Start Date: 21 April), University of Oxford

The Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics hosts scholars and students wishing to engage in research in practical and applied ethics as academic visitors. The Centre is an integral part of the Philosophy Faculty of Oxford University, one of the great centres of academic excellence in philosophical ethics.

Applications are invited three times a year and are to be submitted at least one term in advance of the proposed dates of the visit. Applications are open for one month in advance of the deadlines, which are set at the beginning of week 0 of each term.

The application deadline for the next intake of academic visitors is Monday 7 January 2013.

Application Details for the Visiting Scholars Programme and Visitin...

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