Call for Abstracts by March 30: Carnegie Council Student Research Conference

We are excited to announce Carnegie Council's third Student Research Conference.

This conference will be held in Carnegie Council's New York City headquarters on Wednesday, May 3, 2017 from 12:00-2:30pm.

Lunch will be served during a networking session, followed by presentations of original research by students from universities across the NYC metro area. Audience members will include students, professors, professionals, and the interested public.

Presentations will be 10 minutes long and must make a normative argument about international affairs and ethics. Topics can range from human rights, media, international law, justice, accountability, sustainability, to transparency.

There are a limited number of presentation slots available. In order to select the presentations, we ask that all interested candidates submit an abstract of no more than 500 words. The deadline for the abstract submission is Thursday, March 30.

Judged by a panel of academic and business professionals, the best presentation will receive a free year-long membership to the Council's Carnegie New Leaders program.

If you are interested in submitting, please email your 500-word abstract by March 30 to Amanda Ghanooni at aghanooni@cceia.org.

Please include your full name, email, university, and major/ graduate program. Recent graduates are also welcome to submit.

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