Kirthi Jayakumar's Blog – March 2013 Archive (5)

Do partisan considerations alter how international law is perceived?

The intricate link binding international law and international relations make the inclusion of objectivity in legal allegiances a difficult task. This is particularly evidenced in the Iraq War that began on March 19, 2003. An invasion spearheaded by the United States, the United Kingdom and their Coalition partners, there have been plenty of moments in the trials and inquiries that reveal a continuing allegiance coloured by partisan considerations.

The Chilcot Iraq Inquiry in London…

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Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on March 30, 2013 at 1:59am — No Comments

To what extent?

The reason that most scholars attribute to the “failure” of International Law, is that it is purely consent based. Treaties that bind a state through its consent, ratification and accession alone can be invoked against it. Customary norms that a state does not persistently or subsequently object to are the only things that bind it. Judicial decisions do not hold sway with the principle of stare decisis, as they bind only those states that are party to it. Any source of law, therefore, is…

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Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on March 24, 2013 at 2:10am — No Comments

Droning on

Drones were set out to be a means to avoid collateral damage, but their practical use shows otherwise. While drone strikes are effective in eliminating targets, too many drone attacks without reprieve can incite several political repercussions: by actually making as many terrorists as they kill and by altering perceptions towards the United States – which is increasingly rubbing the people of Pakistan and Yemen (among others) on the wrong side – in the process risking the creation of more…

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Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on March 17, 2013 at 1:10am — 13 Comments

The Slow Climb

Two years since the revolution began, the war is still raging in Syria. On February 12, though, a breakthrough came about when an airfield near Aleppo was captured by a rebel group. For the first time, rebels were able to seize usable warplanes. This not only signifies a triumph on their part, but also marks a change in their approach – as battles in cities have now shifted to attacks on military bases.

About a month ago, rebels in Syria had captured the Taftanaz airfield in northern…

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Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on March 10, 2013 at 1:30am — No Comments

Double standards, much?

China decided against using an armed drone in Myanmar to kill a drug lord who was wanted for the murder of 13 Chinese sailors. Instead, they captured him alive, and brought him to trial in China. To most of the world, this move was laudable. Compared with the United States of America, China seems to have gotten its respect for sovereignty and territoriality down pat, not to forget its understanding of the need to fair trial.
While it is appreciable in comparison with the US…
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Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on March 2, 2013 at 11:13pm — 4 Comments

Carnegie Council

China's "Opinion Deterrence" with Isaac Stone Fish

"I think it's important to contrast what China is doing with what Russia is doing," says Asia Society's Isaac Stone Fish. "Russia influence operations and Russia influence is much more about sowing chaos, it's about destabilization, it's about making America weaker. China is much more about making China stronger. The United States is a vector and a way for China to become stronger." Elon Musk, Alibaba, and China's internal power structures are also discussed in this wide-ranging talk.

American vs. Chinese Propaganda, with Robert Daly

As China's middle class grows, Hollywood is making films with this audience in mind, says the Wilson Center's Robert Daly, previously a producer for the Chinese version of "Sesame Street." How is this different from filmmaking in the World War II and Cold War eras? And why did the Chinese government have a problem with Cookie Monster and Grover?

Global Ethics Weekly: A "Peace Regime" on the Korean Peninsula?

In this new podcast series, we'll be connecting current events to Carnegie Council resources through conversations with our Senior Fellows. This week, Devin Stewart discusses how his essay defending the Singapore Summit holds up a month later. Plus, he and host Alex Woodson speak about Mike Pompeo's strange and unproductive trip to Pyongyang, what a "peace regime" could look like, and the prospects for a unified Korean Peninsula.

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