All Blog Posts Tagged 'rights' (77)

New Book, "The Ordinary Virtues: Moral Order in a Divided World" by Carnegie Council Centennial Chair Michael Ignatieff

What moral values do human beings hold in common? As globalization draws us together economically, are our values converging or diverging? In particular, are human rights becoming a global ethic? These were the questions that led Michael Ignatieff to embark on a three-year, eight-nation journey in search of answers. …

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Added by Carnegie Council on September 20, 2017 at 1:56pm — No Comments

The dialectic of the relationship between international humanitarian law and human rights law

    International humanitarian law in times of war and conflict, if in turn to a set of international rules from the settlement of humanitarian problems arising from armed conflicts, on the one hand, it aims to achieve the pain of war, by organizing intellectual operations or means of war. It is this post's comments, aimed at the protection of persons injured, prisoners, and civilians, as well as the properties that are affected by the armed conflict, either…

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Added by Hanane Saouli on August 5, 2017 at 2:30pm — 2 Comments

Desperately Seeking Metaphors for Global Civics

Less than one week ago, heads of state from 195 countries passed the Paris Agreement – a legally binding international agreement on climate – with the aim of limiting the global temperature rise to below 2°C. This agreement represents, quite possible, the world’s best answer to the most widespread global challenge we face in this century. Global warming renders national borders meaningless, as world leaders recognize our shared destiny and collective responsibility…

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Added by Anna Kiefer on December 16, 2015 at 11:51pm — 2 Comments

Report: Conference on Cultural Rights, Copenhagen, Denmark, November 2015

CREDIT: Jeroen Mul

Can cultural rights become a global discourse for supporting inclusive social and political development, and for fostering intercultural dialogue for the mutual understanding of…

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Added by Carnegie Council on November 25, 2015 at 11:21am — No Comments

Why Gender Parity Matters

This article was written by Laura Tyson and Anu Madgavkar. It was first published on Project Syndicate. 

BERKELEY – The high cost of gender inequality has been documented extensively. But a …

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Added by Carnegie Council on November 18, 2015 at 12:16pm — No Comments

The Problems with Burma's Upcoming "Landmark" Elections

 

As November 8th approaches, news and commentary about the “landmark” Burmese general elections are picking up. As usual, I have my own thoughts about the growing buzz surrounding Election Day.

Let's start off with some quick background information. The upcoming November 8th election in Burma is widely considered to be one of the most important political events in the nation’s history. The authoritarian regime, still warring with several ethnic rebel…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on September 9, 2015 at 4:00pm — 2 Comments

A Step Back for South Africa on the Rule of Law, Courtesy of Al-Bashir

Published originally in the World Post Section of the Huffington Post on 19 June 2015:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jesica-l-santos/a-step-back-for-south-afr_b_7614908.html

This past week the South African government showed utter disregard for its international legal obligations and rule of law when it reportedly assisted the escape from its territory of Sudanese President Omar…

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Added by Jesica L Santos on June 25, 2015 at 2:04pm — 1 Comment

Political Prisoner for a Day: Why Small-Scale Crackdowns Still Work

The past week has confirmed that despite the Burmese government's made-for-export show of reforms, there is still no such thing as political freedom in Burma. Yet, you probably haven't read anything about the nation's ongoing (but increasingly repressed) student protests in this week's headlines. That's largely because the regime has responded in such a way that is threatening enough to stifle dissent at home, but not violent enough to invoke international outrage. This is the "sweet spot"…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on March 15, 2015 at 1:12am — No Comments

Why I’m Following the Burmese Student Protests, and the US Government Should Be Too

Over the past few months, the world has largely overlooked a series of peaceful protests by Burmese students that began in November, coinciding with President Obama’s visit to the Southeast Asian nation. The students are protesting the country’s new National Education Law, which maintains close, centralized government control of the nation’s educational institutions and limit students’ freedom of association (read more…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on February 13, 2015 at 12:30am — 1 Comment

Burma and the Ethics of Engagement

A question I've been grappling with lately concerns engagement with foreign governments that systematically violate human rights. When foreign governments are behaving badly, should we engage with them and try to encourage reform, or sanction them and cut off ties? Is engagement the path to reform, or does it merely reward bad behavior? While this dilemma is central to many foreign affairs situations, this post will focus on…

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Added by Samantha Sherman on December 19, 2014 at 12:30am — 6 Comments

An Agreement That Never Should Have Happened Is Declared Unconstitutional

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jesica-l-santos/

This past week, an Argentinian Federal Court declared null the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) that …

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Added by Jesica L Santos on May 21, 2014 at 7:14pm — No Comments

Memory and Justice: Confronting Past Atrocity and Human Rights Abuse

http://www.issuelab.org/click/download1/memory_and_justice_confronting_past_atrocity_and_human_rights_abuse

of the International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) as a consultancy report for the Ford Foundation’s Andean Region and
The authors acknowledge the indispensable editorial contributions,research assistance, and logistical support of…
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Added by Jesica L Santos on May 7, 2014 at 10:26pm — No Comments

From Amnesties Toward Peace and Reconciliation: Cambodia, Chile, and Mozambique

The goal of this inquiry is to analyze whether or not there can be peace and reconciliation in cases where conflict and massive civil strife were followed by blanket amnesties which included crimes against humanity and gross violations of human rights.

The following case studies examine what took place in three different countries – Cambodia, Chile, and Mozambique – each of which experienced violent domestic conflict and massive human rights violations. The…

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Added by Jesica L Santos on May 7, 2014 at 10:09pm — No Comments

A Dialogue on Global Citizenship, Global Ethics, and Moral Rights

We are sharing here a digital dialogue that took place between Michael Edward Walsh, a visiting scholar at the Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, and Alvaro Cedeno Molinari, Costa Rican ambassador to Japan, on topics related to global ethics and citizenship. —CARNEGIE…

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Added by Carnegie Council on March 26, 2014 at 5:05pm — 1 Comment

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY 2014

In honor of International Women's Day on March 8, we present a selection of Carnegie Council resources from the past year. PHOTO CREDIT: Martina K Photography (…

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Added by Carnegie Council on March 7, 2014 at 12:30pm — No Comments

Cosmopolitanism: Pluralism, Dialogue, and Global Citizenry for a New Era

Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers 

Kwame Anthony Appiah

New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2007.

196 pages



Kwame Anthony Appiah challenges us to adopt the moral manifesto of “cosmopolitanism,” a loyalty to all of humanity, and begs the question of what we owe to strangers simply by virtue of our shared humanity. He joins an important conversation in global ethics on…

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Added by Caitlin Duffy on November 26, 2013 at 10:30am — 1 Comment

From War to a Global Ethic

This Carnegie Council Centennial Symposium took place in the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh, on October 16, 2013. It was part of Andrew Carnegie's International Legacy Week 2013, which celebrated the huge impact made by the Scots-American philanthropist Andrew…

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Added by Joel Rosenthal on November 22, 2013 at 1:30pm — No Comments

Syria’s most dreadful scenario

At the center of Za’atri, in northern Jordan, there’s a bustle of commercial activity. The “Champs-Elysees”, as the main street is known, hosts more than one hundred small street businesses, including rudimentary food shops, barber shops, clothes shops and even a tiny library. Coffee shops are on the rise, and surrounding the “downtown”, as it is called, there are already 12 neighborhoods, and even some soccer fields.

This description could seem certainly alluring if you don’t have in…

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Added by Ana Polo Alonso on October 23, 2013 at 5:37pm — 3 Comments

Guinea: the end of the democratic transition?

With a two years delay, this Saturday more than five million Guineans were finally called to participate in a legislative election that officially certified the completion of the path to democracy –a process that begun in November 2010 with the first transparent and open presidential election in Guinea since its independence from France in 1958.

Yet, do these long overdue elections really mark the final of the transition?

 Technically, yes. Despite flaws –some voting stations…

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Added by Ana Polo Alonso on October 1, 2013 at 8:00am — 2 Comments

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Marlene Laruelle on Europe's Far Right Political Movement

What has led to the rise of far-right parties across Europe and how have they evolved over time? Is immigration really the main issue, or is there a more complex set of problems that vary from nation to nation? What are the idealogical and practical connections between the far right and Russia? Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Marlene Laruelle is an expert on Europe, Russia, Eurasia, and Europe's far right. Don't miss her analysis.

Global Ethics Forum Preview: From the White House to the World with Chef Sam Kass

Next time on Global Ethics Forum, Sam Kass details his time as President Obama’s White House chef and senior policy advisor for nutrition and the links between climate change and how and what we eat. In this excerpt, Kass and journalist Roxana Saberi discuss an uncertain future for food policy in the United States under Trump.

The Rohingya Crisis: "Myanmar's Enemy Within" with Francis Wade

Francis Wade, author of "The Enemy Within," a new book on the Rohingya crisis in Burma, explains the historical background to the persecution of the Muslim Rohingya minority and gives a first-hand account of the terrible situation now. Has democracy been good for Burma? Will some Rohingya refugees become Islamic extremists?

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