Kirthi Jayakumar's Blog Posts Tagged 'law' (2)

To what extent?

The reason that most scholars attribute to the “failure” of International Law, is that it is purely consent based. Treaties that bind a state through its consent, ratification and accession alone can be invoked against it. Customary norms that a state does not persistently or subsequently object to are the only things that bind it. Judicial decisions do not hold sway with the principle of stare decisis, as they bind only those states that are party to it. Any source of law, therefore, is…

Continue

Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on March 24, 2013 at 2:10am — No Comments

Chad's Prosecution Chambers

Twenty years after the brutal reign ended, Chad’s ex-dictator, Hissene Habre, is now being prosecuted by the Extraordinary African Chambers in Senegal. Habre’s exit to Senegal in 1990 came just after his brutal reign drew to an end – a period that was characterised heavily by torture and killings that numbered by the thousands. A domestic Chadian inquiry was instituted, and while in exile, Habre remained at large.

He managed to escape many attempts that were made to initiate trials…

Continue

Added by Kirthi Jayakumar on February 17, 2013 at 1:00am — No Comments

Monthly Archives

2013

2012

Carnegie Council

Global Ethics Weekly: Science Fiction, Micro-democracy, & Information, with Malka Older

Malka Older has spent time as an aid worker in Darfur, Indonesia, and Japan, as was discussed in last week's podcast, but she also has another role: science fiction novelist. Her latest book, "State Tectonics," is the third in a series that explores the concepts of "micro-democracy" and a "global information management bureacracy" in the near future. How have separatists from East Timor to Catalonia influenced Older's novels?

Unlocking the Potential of Young Working Women in the Middle East and North Africa

Through the story of Fatima AlRiami, a doctor in Yemen, Mariel Davis of Education for Employment not only illustrates some of the challenges that young women face in entering the workforce in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), but also highlights the potential of those who do make it into the labor market.

The Nationalist Revival: Trade, Immigration, and the Revolt Against Globalization, with John B. Judis

Why has nationalism suddenly returned with a vengeance around the world? Why are nationalists so angry about free trade and immigration? Why has globalization become a dirty word? In this insightful talk, John B. Judis has some answers to these questions--and prescriptions for the United States.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

E&IA Journal

GEO-GOVERNANCE MATTERS

© 2018   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service