December 2011 Blog Posts (3)

MIT Launches an Online Learning Platform

Building on the success of its Open Course Ware program, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced today that it will be developing an online learning platform called MITx. The course materials will be available free of charge, to be explored at a student's own pace, based on an open-source and scalable software…

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Added by Evan O'Neil on December 19, 2011 at 5:44pm — No Comments

The Case for Nature as a Thematic Cluster

The frontier of ethics has often been defined by the inclusion of moral subjects who were excluded from the previous order. Peter Singer calls it the expanding moral circle. These excluded parts of society typically have no representation or voice in the political processes that control…

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Added by Evan O'Neil on December 2, 2011 at 6:00pm — No Comments

Reimagining a Global Ethic

Introduction

JOEL ROSENTHAL: Good evening and welcome to the Carnegie Council. I have the privilege of introducing our guest and good friend, Michael Ignatieff.

Michael will be speaking on a topic chosen specifically for this occasion. It's a theme that has been discussed among our fellows earlier today. The theme is "Re-Imagining a Global Ethic."

To…

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Added by Carnegie Council on December 1, 2011 at 6:00pm — No Comments

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Global Ethics Forum Preview: The Ethics of Big Data with danah boyd

Next time on Global Ethics Forum, Microsoft Research’s danah boyd discusses the ethical and political implications of big data and artificial intelligence. In this excerpt, boyd explains to journalist Stephanie Sy some of the disturbing issues that arise when machine learning and algorithms are used in the criminal justice system.

What the Qur'an Meant: And Why It Matters with Garry Wills

Northwestern's Garry Wills says that he was surprised to learn that Islam is a much more "inclusive" religion than Judaism or Christianity.

The Future of War: A History, with Lawrence Freedman

"Though most of the literature you will read on the future of war certainly talks about war as between regular armies, as proper fights, now with drones or with autonomous vehicles or robots or whatever, or even painless--cyber and so on--yet actually the reality of war is as it has always been: it is vicious, and it is nasty, and it kills the wrong people, and it does so in considerable numbers."

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