Curt Verschoor
  • Male
  • Montvale, NJ
  • United States
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Curt Verschoor's Page

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Curt Verschoor posted blog posts
Oct 18, 2017
Curt Verschoor's blog post was featured

Global Ethics: Raising the Bar for Business in the 21st Century

Happy Global Ethics Day! Though I wish this day was universally unwarranted, it remains an important endeavor to celebrate the people and organizations striving to abide by the ethical standards that represent the most positive elements of human nature.Regrettably, over the past half-century, citizens around the world have witnessed numerous egregious ethical lapses, like Enron, Bernie Madoff, Volkswagen, Wells Fargo, and more. As a result, many people increasingly believe institutional and…See More
Oct 18, 2017
Curt Verschoor is now a member of Global Ethics Network
Oct 16, 2017

Profile Information

Website
http://www.imanet.org
Job Title
Chair-Emeritus, Committee on Ethics
Organization
IMA (Institute of Management Accountants
What are your interests and areas of expertise in international relations?
Business, Culture, Economy, Ethics, Finance, Governance, Sustainability
Tell everyone a little about yourself and what you hope to gain from the Global Ethics Network.
As former chair of the IMA Committee on Ethics, I led the organization’s efforts to promote and exemplify those standards. Also, since 1999, I regularly contribute to a business ethics column in IMA’s magazine, Strategic Finance. Sadly, over the past two decades, there has rarely, if ever, been a month in which I had a hard time finding content.

Curt Verschoor's Blog

Global Ethics: Raising the Bar for Business in the 21st Century

Posted on October 18, 2017 at 9:00am 0 Comments

Happy Global Ethics Day! Though I wish this day was universally unwarranted, it remains an important endeavor to celebrate the people and organizations striving to abide by the ethical standards that represent the most positive elements of human nature.

Regrettably, over the past half-century, citizens around the world have witnessed numerous egregious ethical lapses, like Enron, Bernie Madoff, Volkswagen, Wells Fargo, and more. As a result, many people increasingly believe…

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Carnegie Council

Global Ethics Weekly: A Blue Wave for Foreign Policy? with Nikolas Gvosdev

Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev and host Alex Woodson discuss what U.S. foreign policy could look like if Democrats take Congress in November and/or the White House in 2020. What do Bernie Sanders' views on international affairs have in common with "America First"? Is there space for a more centrist policy? And after the 2016 election, is the U.S. still able to effectively promote democracy abroad?

Korea & the "Republic of Samsung" with Geoffrey Cain

Korea expert Geoffrey Cain talks about his forthcoming book, "The Republic of Samsung," which reveals how the Samsung dynasty (father and son) are beyond the law and are treated as cult figures by their employees--rather like the leaders of North Korea. He also discusses the prospects for peace on the Korean peninsula--is Trump helping or hurting?--and the strange and sensational story behind the impeachment of President Park Geun-hye.

Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment, with Francis Fukuyama

The rise of global populism is the greatest threat to global democracy, and it's mainly driven not by economics, but by people's demand for public recognition of their identities, says political scientist Francis Fukuyama. "We want other people to affirm our worth, and that has to be a political act." How is this playing out in the U.S., Europe, and Asia? What practical steps can we take to counteract it?

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