The Circulation of money and basis of the mechanical model representation

The description of how this model is created may be found in SSRN 2865571 "Einstein's Criterion Applied to Logical Macroeconomics Modelling"--an 8 page working paper. By assuming that aggregate activities are present in the least number of kinds of ways that they work, and that they quantities flow between specific entities, it is possible to reach this minimum but fully complete representation of the social system of a nation.

If only our experts would try to see that this way of thinking about theoretical macroeconomics leads to an exact science, then would our governments begin to analyze it and come up with some really sensible policies (regardless of the politics involved).

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Comment by David Harold Chester on November 1, 2017 at 3:25am

This model was the result of a lot of thought and analysis to determine the closest fit to this criterion. It is explained and used for analysis in my 310 page book "Consequential Macroeconomics--Rationalizing About how our Social system Works" of 2015. This work on theoretical macroeconomics has at last managed to replace the past pseudo-science of our society into a truly scientific one. Interested/concerned economists should write to me at chesterdh@hotmail.com for a free e-copy of this work.

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