MULTIPLE USE OF THE HEAT FROM THE FIRESIDE

“My kitchen plays a triple role. First of all, I use my kitchen to prepare food with the burning of wood, secondly to keep chicken and to keep myself warm especially during the dry harmattan cold and also drying crops I harvest from the farms including corn and beans. When I cook my food, there is much heat produced and I have constructed a chicken pen so that it benefits from the heat from the cooking of my food. In this household, the heat from the fireside is used to cook the meals and the remnant heat serves to heat the chicken pen and dry the maize before threshing”. Mukam Henry, Village Head Munam Village

Although it can be posited that the significant burning of biomass for heating and drying contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions and thus the climate change phenomenon, the communities interviewed assert that these traditionally constructed kitchens and barns, using locally available materials serves a trap for the smoke generated from burning. Significant amount of the smoke and soot is trapped by the materials most made of bamboos and pegs. Farmers assert that they have scrapped accumulated mixture and this has served as local medicine for various common ailments including stomach aches and healing of sores

Tags: #photo2017
Albums: Eric Ngang
Location: Bamenda

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