“My kitchen plays a triple role. First of all, I use my kitchen to prepare food with the burning of wood, secondly to keep chicken and to keep myself warm especially during the dry harmattan cold and also drying crops I harvest from the farms including corn and beans. When I cook my food, there is much heat produced and I have constructed a chicken pen so that it benefits from the heat from the cooking of my food. In this household, the heat from the fireside is used to cook the meals and the remnant heat serves to heat the chicken pen and dry the maize before threshing”. Mukam Henry, Village Head Munam Village

Although it can be posited that the significant burning of biomass for heating and drying contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions and thus the climate change phenomenon, the communities interviewed assert that these traditionally constructed kitchens and barns, using locally available materials serves a trap for the smoke generated from burning. Significant amount of the smoke and soot is trapped by the materials most made of bamboos and pegs. Farmers assert that they have scrapped accumulated mixture and this has served as local medicine for various common ailments including stomach aches and healing of sores

Tags: #photo2017
Albums: Eric Ngang
Location: Bamenda

Comment

You need to be a member of Global Ethics Network to add comments!

Join Global Ethics Network

Carnegie Council

Reasons for Hope: Earth Day 2018

"You can rest in despair or you can ask: "How can we harness our ingenuity and creativity and ability to cooperate in recognizing that we need to live more sustainably?" We need to be as creative about sustainability as we have been about exploitation." In that spirit here's a selection of Carnegie Council resources from the past year, in honor of Earth Day 2018.

American Engagement: Dialogue at Quail Ridge

A dialogue at Quail Ridge Country Club in Boynton Beach, Florida leads to questions about the efficacy of U.S. foreign policy, gender balance in international decision-making, and the connection between national service and involvement and interest in national affairs.

The Living Legacy of WWI: The Politics & Medicine of Treating Post-Traumatic Stress, with Tanisha Fazal

Although it has been written about for centuries, post-traumatic stress was not officially recognized as a medical condition until the 1980s. However World War I "was really a turning point in terms of acknowledging and starting to identify and treat what we call today post-traumatic stress," says Tanisha Fazal of the University of Minnesota, whose project on treating PTS will make the connection between World War I and current times.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

E&IA Journal

GEO-GOVERNANCE MATTERS

© 2018   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service