CAPTURING NUTRIENT RICH WATER FROM THE THATCHED ROOFS

“Despite the fact that in Mankon village, we are embracing modernity including using modern construction materials like aluminum roofing sheets and cement they we still kept our tradition of having thatched roofs and mud block houses alongside these.
In addition to being part of our cultural identity, the thatches have many advantages. First of all, the thatch captures most of the smoke generated from the burning of wood which would have been a significant contribution to total greenhouse gases in the atmosphere if all allowed in flow into the atmosphere. The sooth accumulated on these thatches serves as a best fertilizer that beats conventional fertilizer. When these thatched roofs are replaced seasonally, we spread the sooth-filled thatch on our farmlands. This serves as high value manure, enhancing crop productivity. This is useful for farms were we have staple crops including vegetables, cereals and cocoyam whose productivity is declining as a result of the weather changes we are experiencing which have bad impact on the solid. Secondly, the water harvested from these thatched roofs has been used by communities for ages as a fungicide and pesticide. When sprayed on subsistence and cash crops which are currently being damaged by a fungal attack which is on increase because the weather is favouring their increase.
Lastly the Mud brick houses are able to store much heat and for most households, reducing the need for more burning of wood for heating” Sussnanh Kumcho, Mankon Village

Tags: #photo2017
Albums: Eric Ngang
Location: Bamenda

Comment

You need to be a member of Global Ethics Network to add comments!

Join Global Ethics Network

Comment by anyi jonathan on March 13, 2018 at 3:19pm

Awesome post!!

Comment by Al LeBlanc on March 8, 2018 at 4:22pm

Most interesting - thanks for creating and sharing !

Carnegie Council

American vs. Chinese Propaganda, with Robert Daly

As China's middle class grows, Hollywood is making films with this audience in mind, says the Wilson Center's Robert Daly, previously a producer for the Chinese version of "Sesame Street." How is this different from filmmaking in the World War II and Cold War eras? And why did the Chinese government have a problem with Cookie Monster and Grover?

Global Ethics Weekly: A "Peace Regime" on the Korean Peninsula?

In this new podcast series, we'll be connecting current events to Carnegie Council resources through conversations with our Senior Fellows. This week, Devin Stewart discusses how his essay defending the Singapore Summit holds up a month later. Plus, he and host Alex Woodson speak about Mike Pompeo's strange and unproductive trip to Pyongyang, what a "peace regime" could look like, and the prospects for a unified Korean Peninsula.

Asia's "Opinion Wars" with Historian Alexis Dudden

As part of our new Information Warfare podcast series, University of Connecticut historian Alexis Dudden looks at the propaganda efforts coming out of Northeast Asia, with a focus on China's Confucius Institutes at American universities. Is China trying to spread its communist ideology through these centers or just teach its language to college students? Are the U.S. and Japan "guilty" of similar efforts?

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

E&IA Journal

GEO-GOVERNANCE MATTERS

© 2018   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service