Peace requires positive combativity in our relations and equally in the face of our own impulses. But to define peace as the struggle won by reason against instincts is false. It is not by fighting that inner peace is attained, but by cultivating an inner state of appeasement. In contrast to a combat, it is a relationship to be built; With oneself, then with others, where reason is not enough, it is necessary also the heart.
Peace is a perpetual weaving of warm relations of good neighborliness based on the human values ​​and the creativity of each other to overcome the difficulties, the clashes and its own frustrations.
Peace is a relationship of well-being together, solid and lasting, based on respect, serenity, cordiality and good understanding between humans. It is founded as much on the expression of the heart as on reason. It is through human warmth that violence can be transcended.
Peace is a life choice in which human interactions are based on the impulses of humanity capable of reversing the tendencies to the violence of the powerful, the vindictive and the angry, touching their heart and reason. A choice of life at the same time individual, collective, economic and political.
If violence seems omnipresent, then the fields of peace are ubiquitous too. It is up to us to cultivate them.

Views: 116

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

How can a nation establish a state of "internal peace" when its government is being organized and run by political parties which are biased toward the interests of relatively small numbers of their people? Usually the ruling party in current democratic systems contains several fractions and only some of them favor the policy being actually taken. If the majorities are small and only 2 sides are representative, then the maximum numbers who are effectively in control are only a quarter of the whole. (2 main parties having 2 main fractions.) Thus a more ideal state of democracy is not necessarily possible and often a minority can gain formal and legal control.

There is also a tendency for the minorities to get more than fair representation, however this may be opposed by the use of wards or regions where the elected member is not always in the party that gets the most total number of votes. Then the call for cultivated peace through a democratic process seems to be to be an impossible achievement.


Carnegie Council

The U.S. Foreign Service and the Importance of Professional Diplomacy, with Nicholas Kralev

Professional diplomats are made not born, says Nicholas Kralev of the Washington International Diplomatic Academy. It's not enough to be a people person: training is needed in specific skills. Sadly, many Americans don't realize how diplomats' successes or failures can affect their own security and prosperity. Even U.S. presidents often don't appreciate the Foreign Service. And under Trump, State Department professionals are leaving in droves.

Uncertainties About America's Global Reliability

Doubts about America's reliability as a guarantor and support of the liberal international order have been increasing since the 2016 election. What impact is this having on America's closest and most critical relationships?

European Futures in the Shadow of American Disengagement, with Andrew Michta

Europe is going through deep structural changes, says Andrew Michta of the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies. He argues that it may become "a "Europe of clusters," where countries even within the EU will align themselves differently depending on their economic or security interests. In any case, these shifts are largely driven by internal factors such as the migration crisis, not by U.S. policy towards Europe.


E&IA Journal


© 2018   Created by Carnegie Council.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service