Would the World Be Better Without the UN?

Event Details

Would the World Be Better Without the UN?

Time: June 12, 2018 from 6pm to 7:30pm
Location: Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs
Street: 170 E. 64th Street
City/Town: New York
Website or Map: https://www.carnegiecouncil.o…
Event Type: public, affairs
Organized By: Carnegie Council
Latest Activity: May 14

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Event Description

Do we need the United Nations? Where would the contemporary world be without its largest intergovernmental organization? And where could it be had the UN's member states and staff performed better?

These fundamental questions are explored by the leading analyst of UN history and politics, Thomas G. Weiss, in his new book Would The World Be Better Without the UN? While counterfactuals are often dismissed as academic contrivances, they can serve to focus the mind; and here, Professor Weiss uses them to ably demonstrate the pluses and minuses of multilateral cooperation and argues that the inward-looking and populist movements in electoral politics worldwide make robust multilateralism more, not less, compelling.

Thomas G. Weiss is the Presidential Professor of Political Science at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and director emeritus of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies.

Eventbrite - Thomas G. Weiss  - Would the World Be Better Without the UN?

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