Toward Democracy: The Struggle for Self-Rule in European and American Thought

Event Details

Toward Democracy: The Struggle for Self-Rule in European and American Thought

Time: April 5, 2017 from 6pm to 7:30pm
Location: Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs
Street: 170 East 64th Street
City/Town: New York
Website or Map: http://www.carnegiecouncil.or…
Event Type: public affairs
Organized By: Carnegie Council
Latest Activity: Feb 28

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Event Description

The story of democracy remains one without an ending, a dynamic of progress and regress that continues to our own day. In the classical age, "democracy" was seen as the failure rather than the ideal of good governance. Beginning in the 16th and 17th centuries, however, the reputation of democracy began to rise, resulting in changes that were sometimes revolutionary and dramatic, sometimes gradual and incremental.


How have understandings of self-rule changed over time on both sides of the Atlantic? Is democracy an ethical ideal or merely a set of institutions?

James T. Kloppenberg is Charles Warren Professor of American History at Harvard University. For his commitment to undergraduate education he has been honored with the Levenson Memorial Teaching Prize by the Harvard Undergraduate Council and named a Harvard College Professor. He has held the Pitt professorship at the University of Cambridge, has taught at L'École des hautes etudes en sciences sociales in Paris, and has lectured throughout Britain, Europe, and the United States.

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