To Fight Against This Age: On Fascism and Humanism

Event Details

To Fight Against This Age: On Fascism and Humanism

Time: February 1, 2018 from 8am to 9:15am
Location: Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs
Street: 170 E. 64th Street
City/Town: New York
Website or Map: https://www.carnegiecouncil.o…
Event Type: public, affairs
Organized By: Carnegie Council
Latest Activity: Jan 12

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Event Description

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In his international bestseller, To Fight Against this Age, Rob Riemen explores the theoretical weaknesses of fascism, which depends on a politics of resentment, the incitement of anger and fear, xenophobia, the need for scapegoats, and its hatred of the life of the mind. His response explores the meaning of European humanism with its universal values of truth, beauty, justice, and love for life--values that are the origin and basis of a democratic civilization.

What has influenced the global resurgence of fascism? How can we revive democracy and combat the present crisis facing Western civilization?

Rob Riemen is an essayist and cultural philosopher. He is the founder of the Nexus Institute, an international center devoted to intellectual reflection and to inspiring Western cultural and philosophical debate.

A number of students tickets are available. For more information, please contact events@cceia.org.

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