The Coming War with China? The Ethics of Confrontation in the Pacific

Event Details

The Coming War with China? The Ethics of Confrontation in the Pacific

Time: April 27, 2017 from 6pm to 7:30pm
Location: Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs
Street: 170 East 64th Street
City/Town: New York
Website or Map: http://www.carnegiecouncil.or…
Event Type: asia dialogues
Organized By: Carnegie Council
Latest Activity: Mar 7, 2017

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Event Description

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This special panel in cooperation with the Strauss Center of the University of Texas, Austin, will examine the prospects for armed conflict in the Pacific and America's moral imperative to keep the peace while still maintaining its values and credibility.

Is there an ethical justification to escalate? Can the United States and China avoid miscalculation and instead find common ground? What can the multiple historical examples of crises over Taiwan and the South China Sea teach the great powers about regional security, deterrence, and avoiding total war? Is it true, as some commentators have argued, that policymakers and the public more broadly have forgotten the horrors and costs of great power conflict, and thus we are sliding into a great-power war? If so, what, if anything, can be done to protect the peace?

Ian Buruma is Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard College.

Joshua Eisenman is a distinguished scholar at the Strauss Center.

Jennifer M. Harris is senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Carnegie Council Senior Fellow Devin Stewart will moderate this event.

There will be a reception following the panel discussion.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LIVE WEBCAST

on Thursday, April 27, 2017 from 6:00PM - 7:30PM ET (UTC/GMT -5 hours)

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Eventbrite - Panel Discussion - The Coming War with China? The Ethics of Confrontation in the Pacific

A number of students tickets are available. For more information, please contact events@cceia.org.

Photo: USS Denver and the Republic of Korea Navy in the East China Sea. CREDIT: U.S. Pacific Command (CC)

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