Nadine Strossen - HATE: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech

Event Details

Nadine Strossen - HATE: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech

Time: June 5, 2018 from 8am to 9:30am
Location: Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs
Street: 170 E. 64th Street
City/Town: New York
Website or Map: https://www.carnegiecouncil.o…
Event Type: public, affairs
Organized By: Carnegie Council
Latest Activity: May 14

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Event Description

We hear too many incorrect assertions that "hate speech"—which has no generally accepted definition—is either absolutely unprotected or absolutely protected from censorship. Although U.S. law allows government to punish hateful or discriminatory speech in specific contexts when it directly causes imminent serious harm, the government may not punish such speech solely because its message is disfavored, disturbing, or vaguely feared to possibly contribute to some future harm.

Are "hate speech" laws effective or counterproductive? Should hate speech be protected under the first amendment?

Nadine Strossen is the John Marshall Harlan II Professor of Law at New York Law School and the former president of the American Civil Liberties Union.

Eventbrite - Nadine Strossen - HATE: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech, Not Censorship

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